Solved

Open Windows Problem

Posted on 1998-11-10
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Problem:  Open Windows Version 3 will not start up.

Computer: Sun IPC  Sun OS 4.1.4

Error Message: (When log in as user)
/files/home/users/thicks/.xinitrc
Illegal Instruction
Core Dumped

(when log in as root)
/usr/openwin/lib/Xinitrc
Illegal Instruction
Core Dumped

Note: No problems logging in as user "thicks" on other machines on the network.  Problem is on this one computer only.

The files .xinitrc and Xinitrc have been checked and are not corrupt.
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Question by:rway
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braveheart earned 200 total points
ID: 2007728
Examine the core to see which program failed.  Was it xinit itself or was it some other program that xinit was trying to start up (i.e. one of the commands in the .xinitrc file).  This may help you to narrow down the problem.

It could be that you are running a different version of the operating system on your sun than on other machines. You may be trying to run a program which was compiled at a later (or otherwise incompatible) version.  It could be a problem in installation so that xinit or open windows was corrupted and needs to be re-installed.
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Author Comment

by:rway
ID: 2007729
How do I examine the core.  It is not a kernal crash, so modifying the rc.local did not save an image.

No network or software changes have been made.  The problem just appeared on its own.
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Expert Comment

by:braveheart
ID: 2007730
When you get a message which says "core dumped" you should find a file called "core" in the current directory which is a snapshot of the executing program at the moment it crashed. It doesn't necessarily refer to a kernel crash and has nothing to do with rc.local.

Note that it is possible to get this message and the core file be thrown away. This will happen if you have limited the size of core dump file (by using the "limit coredumpsize" command in csh, for example) and the failing program is bigger than the specified size. In this case you will have to remove the limit first. Alternatively, if there is too little disk space to dump core then it will not get saved.

Once you have a core file, to determine which executable crashed  try using "file core" which I think tells you the name of the original program. Failing that, use a debugger to find it out.
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