Solved

How much ram does win98 support ?

Posted on 1998-11-16
3
155 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-29
How much ram does win98 support. Is it like win95 limited to 64 MB ram ?
0
Comment
Question by:vgnc
3 Comments
 

Author Comment

by:vgnc
ID: 1647645
That's the motherboard limitation, but in win95 the addressable amount of memory is limited to 64 MB, so you can put more memory in your pc but it has no effect.
So my question is still not answered. Somebody knows ?
0
 
LVL 6

Accepted Solution

by:
sgenther earned 10 total points
ID: 1647646
Where did you hear that?...95 will use as much ram as you can give it...I have 96 MB ram and 95 uses it all ....and check this out...
PSS ID Number: Q181594
Article last modified on 05-11-1998
 
WINDOWS:95
 
WINDOWS
 

======================================================================
---------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:
 
 - Microsoft Windows 95
---------------------------------------------------------------------
 
SYMPTOMS
========
 
If you install more than two gigabytes (GB) of memory (RAM) in your
computer, you may be able to use only two GB of RAM in Windows 95.
 
CAUSE
=====
 
Although Windows 95 has the ability to address up to four GB of physical
RAM in a computer, it can access and use only up to two GB.
 
NOTE: The two GB limitation is theoretical. If you encounter any issues
using more than one GB of RAM, see the following article in the Microsoft
Knowledge Base:
 
   ARTICLE-ID: Q184447
   TITLE     : Insufficient Memory to Initialize Windows
 
Additional query words: 2 4 64 limit
======================================================================
Keywords          : win95 kbenv
Version           : WINDOWS:95
Platform          : WINDOWS
Issue type        : kbprb
=============================================================================
Copyright Microsoft Corporation 1998.
98 will address just as much if not more.
 

0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:larbel
ID: 1647647
First of all, if you're using older chipset motherboard, for instance, 430TX it only can cache up to 64Mb memory and therefore, and amount over 64Mb will decrease performance, but not serious though.

On the other hand, if your motherboard is able to cache over 64Mb, you'll still see the performance different, i.e. less swap movement.  Say if you're working with a 200Mb photoshop graphic file, if you have only 64Mb just resizing the file would take forever, however, with more ram, it decrease the use of swap and less time required to finish the job.  440LX/BX can cache up to 2Gb ram as I recall.  So, though you wouldn't see a huge increase in performance, but you will still have a better overall system.  (128Mb is a good size)
0

Featured Post

ScreenConnect 6.0 Free Trial

Discover new time-saving features in one game-changing release, ScreenConnect 6.0, based on partner feedback. New features include a redesigned UI, app configurations and chat acknowledgement to improve customer engagement!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

While rebooting windows server 2003 server , it's showing "active directory rebuilding indices please wait" at startup. It took a little while for this process to complete and once we logged on not all the services were started so another reboot is …
An article on effective troubleshooting
As developers, we are not limited to the functions provided by the VBA language. In addition, we can call the functions that are part of the Windows operating system. These functions are part of the Windows API (Application Programming Interface). U…
Windows 8 comes with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from the new interface is a Start button and Start Menu. Many users do not like it, much preferring the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows X…

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question