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Am I missing an option in C++ Builder 3 ??

Posted on 1998-11-17
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Last Modified: 2010-04-01
I'm developping a DLL using Borland C++ Builder 3.  I've 1 unit containing all the exported functions and several units containing internal functions.  When I compile the project in the IDE and take a Quick View, the ordinals of the exported functions are 0,1,2,3,etc... .  However, when I compile the project from the command-line, using an rsp file the ordinals are totally different.  Can anyone explain this and come up with a solution to tune both methods onto each other ??

Thank you,

Johan
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Question by:ppr
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nietod earned 50 total points
ID: 1178033
If you intend to link by ordinal, then you must use a .def file to specify the ordinals for the DLL.  (Not really recommended in C++)  Otherwise, just use link by name (the default) and don't worry about this.

Let me know if you have questions.
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by:ppr
ID: 1178034
I need a DLL where the ordinals correspond with the order of the functions.  I use the _export keyword in the function declaration, so I thought I didn't had to use a .def file.






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by:nietod
ID: 1178035
No, if you want to use ordinals, you must have a .def file.  However, .def's in C++ pose an extra challenge--name decoration.  C++ "decorates" function names with a "code" that expresses the parameters types the function expects.  This is so that overloaded functions have unique names.  If you use a .def file you will need to yse the decorated names, not the names you specified in the source code.  Unfortuantely, you don't know the decorated name (although you can see it by looking with dumpbin.)  But specifying a decorated names is ugly. A better idea is to use the "extern "C" " declaration on your exported functins.  This dissables name decoration (and overloading) on the functions you specify.  Look at extern "C" in the docs.  Let me know if you have any questions.
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by:ppr
ID: 1178036
Thank you.  It works perfect.
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