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Microsoft Visual C/C++ (16 bit) v1.50 and v1.52 - Y2K compliant???

Posted on 1998-11-17
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Does anyone know if MSVC C/C++ v1.50 and v1.52 (16 bit) are year 2000 compliant?

I would assume yes, as the compiler/linker do not deal with dates. The only problem I see might be old BIOS calls for system date?

I have checked the Microsoft web site but found nothing??

Thanks in advance.
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Question by:gdinse
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by:gdinse
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by:emmons
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by:gdinse
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I require information of the 16 bit MSVC .. but i suppose if Microsoft isn't interested then it will be difficult to obtain information elsewhere. if nothing else is forth coming then it's yours.
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by:emmons
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Are you using these in Win3.x or in DOS?
It seems like the problem is going to be in the OS, not the libraries themselves, right?  
I would have felt better to see references to the MSRT* libraries on the MS site though, but they do talk about the limitations in both 16 bit systems. They also talk about an upgraded WinFile.exe for Win3.1.

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So, if I understand you correctly, the compiler, linker should be ok, its just the system information BIOS calls pick up?

The OS will be Win95.
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That is the way that I read it.
The target will need to have the Y2K complient version of the OS (i.e. the update to WinFile and command.com) but that should be it. All of the calls will go through their, and life should be just ducky. Or so says Microsoft <G>

Why are you building 16 bit applications for W95?
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by:gdinse
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Originally, for compatiblility with some clients who use to run Win3.1, but now have upgraded. We're still to convert our systems so still require Y2K compliance.

Thanks for your help.
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Gotcha. The conversion is never trivial. I was worried that you were doing new development.
Good luck.
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