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FileSystem is full...

Posted on 1998-11-18
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Recently, I do a ufsdump and backup the filesystem onto
another harddisk.
During one of the attempts to ufsdump, I abort the process
and restart the ufsdump again.

I found my root partition usage is up to 100%, up from
87%. How can I find out where all these "new" files that
pop-up all of a sudden that take up so much space.

What will be the best way and command to use ?
Pls advise.
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Question by:slok
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3 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 2007922
du
find
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:arthurd
ID: 2007923
cd /
du -sk *

Look to see what is the biggest directory in the root partition.  cd into that directory and do another du -sk.  You should be able to find out what's taking up so much disk space.

Look in the /dev/ directory.  If you mistyped the device on the ufsdump, it will just dump it into a file in that directory.
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Accepted Solution

by:
n0thing earned 100 total points
ID: 2007924
I would suggest you to do a "du -d /" this command will only
reports files/directory belonging to the / partition. You will have a list of all the directory belonging to the / partition with its size. Then just go in the biggest and see if there is any file that you need/don't need or doesn't suppose to be there. Check & remove it.
Or simply a "find / -xdev -mtime 2 -print" this command will find all the file that has been created on your root file system within the last 2 days.

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