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Hard Drive Space

I have a harddrive that is 14.4Gb in size.  When I click the C drive icon in my computer, it shows the harddrive is 13.4 in size.  What happened to the other 1.0Gb?
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cbrookhart
Asked:
cbrookhart
1 Solution
 
demarbCommented:
Anytime you install a hard drive it will never register as the size reported by a manufacturer.  A 4.3 Gb drive shows as 4.09 Gb.  It is the same with all hard drives.  A certain percentage of the drive space is required for the FAT and cannot be used, therefore it won't show up as available drive space.
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cmcgeeCommented:
Windows Defines a Meg as 1,048,576
Hard Drive manufacturers define a Meg as 1,000,000

as the Drives get larger, you will notice the missing space accordingly.

Craig
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rosefireCommented:
When you format a hard drive some space is used for that FAT tables and format information. The true size of the disk should be reflected in FDISK.  After formatting the storage space remaining will be reported. FDISK uses 1 MEG = 1,048,576 bytes.
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OttaCommented:
> A certain percentage of the drive space is required for
> the FAT and cannot be used, therefore it won't show up
> as available drive space.

Nope.  CMCGEE has the correct answer:

Calc;    14.4*(1000**3)/(1024**3)  
Result = 13.411





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rosefireCommented:
That doesn't explain why the original poster says...

" A 4.3 Gb drive shows as 4.09 Gb."

1000/1024 * 4.3 Gig  = 4.2 Gig  The original poster is still missing 1 Gig.

Sorry, CNCGEE's answer doesn't add up.
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rosefireCommented:
Sorry, he is still missing 1/10 = .1 gig.  (Dropped the ".").
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rosefireCommented:
Actually, I am picking on demarb's numbers, not the original poster.  I think we may all be talking about different things.  Some of us assume that the space available is being reported by DOS as available or used.  Remember, a 1.44 MB floppy is 2.0 MB raw before it is formatted.  Cbroolhart is apparently looking at something different than the rest.  CNCGEE's answer does add up for Cbrookhart's ratios.
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OttaCommented:
DEMARB writes:

> A 4.3 Gb drive shows as 4.09 Gb

calc 4.3*(1000**3)/(1024**3)
Result = 4.004

ROSEFIRE writes about a FOUR-gig disk:

> 1000/1024 * 4.3 Gig  = 4.2 Gig  

Try (1000*1000*1000)/(1024*1024*1024) * 4.3 Gig

> The original poster is still missing 1 Gig.

CBROOKHART wrote about a FOURTEEN-gig disk:

>  14.4Gb in size.  ... 13.4

ROSEFIRE wrote:

>  Sorry, CNCGEE's answer doesn't add up.

However, 'CMCGEE' has the correct answer.





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NoteranCommented:
I completely agree with the above comments, it is true that harddrive manufacturers like to put let's say 9GB on their label, but they take 1GB as 1000MB wich is wrong. The FAT also eats a lot of drivespace; If u still want a bigger HD you can do the following: Since you have a very big HD the clusters are very big - So if you don't mind i would use FIPS.EXE ( from LINUX ) to create another partitions, thereby making the clusters smaller and the files will take lesser space ( EXAMPLE: if you create a file of 0bytes it will take at least 4kb !!! because it uses an entire cluster !!!)

I would be honored to give more detailed info, just ask - My telephone bill is getting a bit big, so have a nice day !
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