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Second hard drive

Posted on 1998-11-21
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Last Modified: 2010-04-27
If I have one hard drive, and on the same ribbon controller have a CD rom, how can I install a second hard drive? The controller is built into the mother board.
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Question by:trozox
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by:omsec
ID: 1012824
you have to use the secondary IDE - Controller. To increase speed of your Hard Disks, i would attach both HDs to the primary Controller and the CD to the second. Make sure, your first (biggest) HD is jumped/configured as MASTER and the second is SLAVE. The CD-Rom maybe MASTER, or MASTER/SINGLE in that case.
If you don't have a second IDE-Controller, then it's a prob, you might have to buy a PCI/IDE-Controller Card
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by:gward28
ID: 1012825
you might also check your sound card some sound cards have secondary IDE ports on them.
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by:omsec
ID: 1012826
or graphics card maybe
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cgswiger earned 50 total points
ID: 1012827
You have a couple of choices: you can attach the additional HD to your secondary IDE as a master, or switch your CD ROM on the secondary IDE and make the new HD a slave on your primary IDE. I just recently installed an additional HD and I also have my CD ROM on the primary IDE as a slave. The new drive is currently on the secondary IDE as a master. My intentions are to make my new drive the primary master, my CD ROM the primary slave, and my old drive the secondary master. I've heard arguments both ways concerning where to locate the CD ROM. I agreed that it makes better sense to spread the flow through to the HDs through both IDEs, rather than daisy chain them on the primary. But, I really do not know which is best. If you decide to do as I am doing, you'll first have to physically install your HD on the secondary IDE as a master, or daisy chain it as a slave on your primary IDE. Watch those jumper settings. Once your connected, you'll have to access set up and perform an auto detection. Be sure to check your CMOS settings and make sure the IDE configuration you've selected  for your new drive is in auto and the "mode" is in LBA if you have the option. This is for drives larger than 528 MB. Make sure your secondary IDE is enabled within set up or it will not detect your new drive (if you place it there) or your CD ROM if you've relocated it. Once you've detected the drive, save and exit set up. You'll then have to reboot in the MS DOS mode and enter the "FDISK" command at the prompt to partition the drive if necessary. Some of the earlier OS can only partition to 2.1 GB. I had a 2.5 GB HD, so I ended up with a letter drive of 2.1 GB and an extended letter drive of 400 MB. You must take great caution at which drive you are partitioning! If you perform this FDISK command on your existing HD you'll lose all of your files. While you're in set up detecting the drives, you will be able to distinguish one drive from the other. Make sure you're performing FDISK on the proper drive. Once the drive is partitioned, exit out of the program entirely and reboot the system in the regular mode and enter set up. Check your CMOS settings. You should see your new drive. Now go ahead and boot up your system. Open My Computer and you should see your new drive, if used in it's entirety, or the partitions if there were extended drives. You will note your original drive is still "C" and your CD ROM has been moved to the last letter drive. Now right click once on one of your new letter drives and select format. After it formats, perform the same operation on the remaining letter drives. If you want to transfer the data from your old HD onto the new, you'll need a program like Drive Copy from Powerquest to perform the operation. Remember, your old drive is still your boot drive. Once you've copied the data from old to new, you'll have to make the necessary physical changes to your IDEs and cables and perform another auto detection. You're goal is to establish your new drive as your boot drive. If your system is booting up O.K. on your new drive as a master after you've copied the files from your old drive, you should be able to go ahead and format your old drive, destroying all your data, clearing it for additional storage. Before you buy a new HD, make sure your system will support the larger capacity drives. My MB and OS will only support drives between 538 MB and 8.4 GB. Hope this helps. You're welcome to E-mail me at cswiger@alleghenypower.com
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