Solved

module

Posted on 1998-11-21
4
335 Views
Last Modified: 2012-05-04
As I can specific the modules load at system boot up time at /etc/modules/'uname -r'/'uname -v'.default, but, it seems that I cannot specify the parameter of those modules there ! As a result, where can I specify the parameter of the modules ?

Andrew
0
Comment
Question by:andrewyu
  • 2
4 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:dochench
ID: 1638565
I'm not sure i'm understanding your question right, but either way, this may help you out. After recompiling my kernel, It was not finding the IPX and Appletalk modules because I didn't compile them in or as modules. So, I went into the /etc/bashrc (your mileage may vary depending upon distro) and aliased them out..
example
alias net-pf-4 off
alias net-pf-5 off

you may be able to alias it to include whatever options you are wanting.

If this isn't at all what you are wanting, sorry, just a comment. ;)
Hench.

0
 

Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 1638566
As I know, there is a file (/etc/modules/'uname -r'/'uname -v'.default) in Caldera OpenLinux 1.3 storing a list of modules load at bootup time, but, how can I declare the parameter pass to those modules in the list ?

Andrew
0
 
LVL 2

Accepted Solution

by:
jprohart earned 20 total points
ID: 1638567
There is a file /etc/conf.modules. Put your modules options here.
eg:

alias eth0 ne
options ne ioaddress 0x300
alias eth1 3c5x9
options 3c5x9 ...
0
 

Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 1638568
Thank you very much and I will try it a little bit later !

Andrew
0

Featured Post

Master Your Team's Linux and Cloud Stack

Come see why top tech companies like Mailchimp and Media Temple use Linux Academy to build their employee training programs.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Over the last ten+ years I have seen Linux configuration tools come and go. In the early days there was the tried-and-true, all-powerful linuxconf that many thought would remain the one and only Linux configuration tool until the end of times. Well,…
Fine Tune your automatic Updates for Ubuntu / Debian
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Connecting to an Amazon Linux EC2 Instance from Windows Using PuTTY.

790 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question