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Our unix system is becoming corrupted over time...

Posted on 1998-11-23
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
We are having trouble with a lynxos (a real time flavour of unix) system losing blocks of data used by the kernel. Our system sits in an environment in which it is often reset or switched off without being shutdown properly. We are finding that the system seems to gradually lose functionality , ie over time we are are losing the ability to use the drivers. We believe that because the system is not being shutdown properly data that is sitting in the cache is not put back to disk, therefor we are gradually corrupting files necessary to run the OS. We cannot avoid our system from being shutdown in this manner. Does our theory sound plausible and how can we fix this problem to provide a reliable system?
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Question by:fredi112398
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by:ahoffmann
ID: 2008032
Your statement makes sense.

Can you add a cron which syncs the filesystem, lets say every 10 minutes.
This is not a solution, but reduces the amount of lost data.
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Expert Comment

by:braveheart
ID: 2008033
Very few operating systems take kindly to just being turned off. Why do you have to?  Could you use an alternative system that always flushes its files to disk, or is it possible to disable caching in Lynxos? Of course that would have a performance penalty.
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Expert Comment

by:elfie
ID: 2008034
If you're loosing data, do you mean loosing physical data on disk?
if so, are you running fsck when booting ?
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Expert Comment

by:tgreaser
ID: 2008035
not to sound to simple but why not buy an UPS.
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Accepted Solution

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dannyarc earned 200 total points
ID: 2008036
Power interruption damage nearly always logical filing structure, it may damage system phisicals too, not necessarily hard disk.
You have three ways:
1) to find the reason of the interruption. If external then contact your power station and you can establish agreements for being informed in time; if internal change your switches to support electrical load.
2) to change your system. It must become fault tolerant: hardware, with an UPS and/or changing your computer board's so as to be able to be replaced to warmth, with hard disks supporting RAID; software backing up your data frequently and on more supports and more copies possible.
3) to wait the disaster.

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