Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Searching for the right technology

Posted on 1998-11-24
5
Medium Priority
?
169 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-12
 I need a high-resolution (>=1200 dpi) and low-price (<=$1000) b/w printer for color separation. What kind of printer should I buy?
  The problems that I'm aware of:
  1. The laser printers stretches the film (even more than 1 mm)
  2. The laser printers' dots are not very clear.
  3. The ink jet printers' real resolution is usually very low.
  4. The solid-ink printers' precision is not very good, and their resolution is lower than the laser printers' resolution.
0
Comment
Question by:biroadam
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
5 Comments
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:tstaddon
ID: 2013378
Here's a guide table for you:

Printer type     Initial cost    Running costs     Colour quality

Laser/LED        High ($1000s)   medium            Good
Inkjet           Low  ($100s)    High              Very good
Microdry (ALPS)  Low  ($100s)    Very High         Excellent

Inkjet printers have low res? Epsons run at 1440DPI and their variable technology is about the best I've seen outside of a high end laser.

What you need to do is go into a computer shop, get a print of a page of text AND a sample dot page simulating your colour seperation at maximum resolution off a laser printer, an Epson ink jet (preferably the top end models like the 600 series) and the other technologies. How else can you check the quality?
0
 

Author Comment

by:biroadam
ID: 2013379
tstaddon,
thank you for the answer, but it isn't what I really need.

I don't need a COLOR printer, I need a high resolution BLACK/WHITE printer. This printer must have:
1. resolution >= 1200 dpi. I don't think that a 1440 dpi inkjet Epson has a real 1440 dpi resolution (I think that it is much worse that a 1200 dpi laser)
2. no film/paper stretch (I didn't see any laser printer which haven't streched the paper [<-- high temperature])
3. clear dots.

Please, if you saw a printer like this, tell me the manufacturer, model and technology.

Regards,
Adam

0
 

Author Comment

by:biroadam
ID: 2013380
tstaddon,
thank you for the answer, but it isn't what I really need.

I don't need a COLOR printer, I need a high resolution BLACK/WHITE printer. This printer must have:
1. resolution >= 1200 dpi. I don't think that a 1440 dpi inkjet Epson has a real 1440 dpi resolution (I think that it is much worse that a 1200 dpi laser)
2. no film/paper stretch (I didn't see any laser printer which haven't streched the paper [<-- high temperature])
3. clear dots.

Please, if you saw a printer like this, tell me the manufacturer, model and technology.

Regards,
Adam

0
 
LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:public
ID: 2013381
If you really need accuracy consider a photoplotter. Typical accuracy if 0.1 mil for a large sheet. These are used to print PCB patterns.
0
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
mark2150 earned 200 total points
ID: 2013382
Film/paper stretch is not the fault of the printer, it's the fault of the media! Paper is hydroscopic (absorbs water) the fuser roller will dry out *any* paper. A 1% dimensional change is not uncommon. Use your better grades of clay papers will help. Hammermill makes a special laser ultra white that is much whiter, smoother, and dimensionally stable. Printing on a good quality laser will be good, but still not perfect, for color separation.

You should print a full color image on a thermal sublimable dye transfer printer and then separate it normally. You can try for color separations on this type of printer but you wind up tripling your media costs. Conventional separation techniques will give you better registration and lower operating costs. The savings in the separation are outweighed by the media costs.

Calcomp and others make thermal sublimable dye transfer printers but they aren't cheap to buy or run. Thermal sublimable printing technology doesn't heat the paper and is less apt to stretch. Additionally they usually take special media that is more dimensionally stable than pulp/rag paper.

The reason that you can't find a good B&W printer that meets your specs is that the technology just doesn't exist to meet all of your requirements at once.

M

0

Featured Post

VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Causes of paper jams:The following are the main causes of paper jams. Guides:If the guides for the paper are not set correctly they may cause the paper to enter at an angle. You should ensure that the guides are set correctly for the paper type a…
This article shows how to get a list of available printers for display in a drop-down list, and then to use the selected printer to print an Access report or a Word document filled with Access data, using different syntax as needed for working with …
This video Micro Tutorial shows how to password-protect PDF files with free software. Many software products can do this, such as Adobe Acrobat (but not Adobe Reader), Nuance PaperPort, and Nuance Power PDF, but they are not free products. This vide…
Please read the paragraph below before following the instructions in the video — there are important caveats in the paragraph that I did not mention in the video. If your PaperPort 12 or PaperPort 14 is failing to start, or crashing, or hanging, …

609 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question