Powercad ( CAD ) Software for " Windows 95/NT"

I am new to the  CAD systems, i need to transfer some old drawings for the manufacturing and general of a valve from the blueprints i currently have to my computer,  i ran accross this catalog containing the following software:
"  POwercad ( CAD ) Software for "WIndows 95/NT"
Design and create Shop drawings Quickly and easily with powercad.  Create, Regenerate, Delete or modify Simple to COmplex " Drawings ".  Easy to use Windows Interface.
Features:
256 layers,  16 colors. GEometric Tolerancing.  Over (12) types of dimensioning.  (10)  styles of crosshatching.
Zoom/Pan/Delete last. COmplete trimming and extending.  DFX import/export capability.  Drivers included for popular printers/plotters.  Includes interface to CAM.  Complete manuals and tutorials.  Upgradeable to POWERSTATION.

I need to know if this software meets my needs, and what other parts i need to start drawing.

Thank You,

George
georgecastroAsked:
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MirkwoodConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Autocad is the market leader at the moment in 2d & 3d CAD
Solidworks is the best way to go for solid modelling
Autocad LT or Intellicad (100% autocad clone) are the cheap solutions.

To find more about powercad, this is there web site http://www.powercad.com.au/

But my recommendation would be Intellicad. A user-friendly version of Autocad
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georgecastroAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 100
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mark2150Commented:
If you're serious about doing this type of work get online with the other 90% of the field and go with some variant of AutoCAD. I *know* it's not cheap, but it is the standard by which the others are measured. It is the closest thing to a "universal" language of CAD and there are *TON* of 3rd party add-ons.

M

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elkiorsCommented:
Yep, AutoCAD is definately the way to go, although if I'm honest, we use FastCAD from evolution computing which suits our needs. We use AutoCAD LT97 to allow us to communicate with other people mostly, but it'll do just about everything you'll ever need. You could go the whole hog and get AutoCAD R14 and that will allow you to do full 3d modelling etc.

Darren

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elkiorsCommented:
I've just had a thought, you say you're new to CAD. By the sounds of it you're just like I used to be. A 'proper' draughtsman used to good ol' pencil (or pen) and a drawing board and has finally found that CAD will eventually take over your soul.

If you need a bit of a run down of the different capabilities of CAD and all the terminology to make your transition a little easier then post a comment. I'd be happy to go through the basics of what you might need from a system, things like layering and DXF etc. I've checked your user page to see if I could get any more info about your origins which might help be be a bit more specific. If it helps, I'm in England and therefore used to First Angle Projection and BS308 Engineering Drawing standards. (At least it used to be BS308 I suppose theres some obscure ISO or european standard now.)
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kodiakbearCommented:
Fixed the -1 problem on this question.
Escrow points corrected.

kb
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