Map \\Server\Users\User1 with %Username%

The senario looks as follow:
\\Server\Users\User1 has a file File.exe and a dir. Documents.
I want to Map \\Server\Users\User1 by writing Net Use H: \\Server\Users\%Username%
then h: looks:
H:\
-\Documents
-File.exe
and NOT
H:\User1\
-\Documents
-File.exe
How do I do??
Rickard
UddenAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
mbreukerCommented:
Here is another option for you:

Share each users directory as a "hidden" share. To make it hidden, just add a $ sign at the end of the share name. For instance, to share \\<servername>\users\bob, you would name the share BOB$. Then you can type map H: \\<servername>\BOB$.

Of course this is a lot of administrative overhead if you need to do this for more than a handful of users. The "Microsoft solution" is to use the SUBST command, which only produces the desired result if the user is running NT workstation.

Sorry, the "net use <driveletter>" command is not as robust as Novell's "map" command. Maybe this will change soon. There are third party administrative tools that may allow you to do this. You are certainly not the first person to ask this question and it is actually a fairly common request on this thread.

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Tim HolmanCommented:
Udden,
  It's working as designed.
  If you want to go up another level, the only way is to type NET USE H: \\SERVER1\USERS then CD into the directory you want.
  However, you could put this in your logon script :

NET USE H: \\SERVER1\USERS
CD H:\%USERNAME%

  ..or put another level in your directory sructure - ie \\SERVER1\USERS\User1\User1.

Tim
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bphillipsCommented:
You can't.  If you use \\servername\sharename\%username% then it will create a folder in that share with full control ntfs permissions for that person.  If you use \\servername\%username% you will get the required results, but you must create the folder and share yourself.
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carmineCommented:
If the clients are NT Workstation (not W95) you can use the SUBST command:

SUBST H: \\Server\Users\%Username%
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UddenAuthor Commented:
Yes that work but you need a script!
/Rickard
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UddenAuthor Commented:
I don't want scripts!!
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UddenAuthor Commented:
Strange? It looks like I have 2 answers.
Thats how it become two "No Scripts".

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UddenAuthor Commented:
"There are third party administrative tools that may allow you to do this." What and where?
/R
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Tim HolmanCommented:
Have I understood your problem correctly ??

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sdczernoCommented:
This is how I usually do this.

Create a New User Template. Under Profile, in the login script field type login.bat. In the Home directory choose connect drive letter H: to \\servername\%username%. H for Home Directory.

Now I create a batch file like the following:

@echo off
if %OS% == Windows_NT goto winnt

:win
rem used for windows 3.11, 95 or 98
net use f: \\servername\fdrive
net use g: \\servername\gdrive
net use h: /home
net use i: \\servername\users
goto end

:winnt
net use f: \\servername\fdrive
net use g: \\servername\gdrive
rem net use h: /home Windows NT Workstation or Server does this for you
net use i: \\servername\users

:end

Save batch file as login.bat.
copy the batch file to \winnt\system32\repl\scipts\import

Now, I create a share name for that user the same as their user name(ex. User Name=JOHN, Share Name=JOHN) under the directory USERS which is shared as USERS.

Hope this helps.
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UddenAuthor Commented:
No. You have to share all the users directory! If you have 120 users it becomes timeconsumming!
But I like the script, it gave me one idé.
/Rickard
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sdczernoCommented:
But the answer you accepted had you share a driectory too. Using his way you cannot even use %username% when creating a new user. Did you implement his answer?
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