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What do the rmt0.#'s mean

Posted on 1998-12-01
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Wan someone quickly define what each of the devices means?

/dev/rmt0
/dev/rmt0.1
/dev/rmt0.2
...
/dev/rmt0.7

Thanx
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Question by:aleyva
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2 Comments
 
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by:
ahoffmann earned 150 total points
ID: 2008176
Are you talking about AIX?
Then this means for example:
  /dev/rmt0.2
     1'st tape device, rewind on close

see man rmt
0
 

Author Comment

by:aleyva
ID: 2008177
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|Tape Drive Special File Characteristics                                              |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|Special File Name  |Rewind-on-Close   |Retension-on-Open  |Bytes per Inch            |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|/dev/rmt*          |Yes               |No                 |Density setting #1        |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|/dev/rmt*.1        |No                |No                 |Density setting #1        |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|/dev/rmt*.2        |Yes               |Yes                |Density setting #1        |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|/dev/rmt*.3        |No                |Yes                |Density setting #1        |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|/dev/rmt*.4        |Yes               |No                 |Density setting #2        |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|/dev/rmt*.5        |No                |No                 |Density setting #2        |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|/dev/rmt*.6        |Yes               |Yes                |Density setting #2        |
|-------------------|------------------|-------------------|--------------------------|
|/dev/rmt*.7        |No                |Yes                |Density setting #2        |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

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