Solved

What do the rmt0.#'s mean

Posted on 1998-12-01
3
300 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Can someone quickly define what each of the devices means?

/dev/rmt0
/dev/rmt0.1
/dev/rmt0.2
...
/dev/rmt0.7

Thanx
A
0
Comment
Question by:aleyva
  • 2
3 Comments
 

Author Comment

by:aleyva
ID: 2008178
Edited text of question
0
 

Accepted Solution

by:
procguy earned 50 total points
ID: 2008179
The /dev/rmt0.x   [x=0..255] is for use of removable tapes in raw mode (ie, not block mode like a hard drive).  You can use this driver in scripts via the rmt command, or use it in backup when using cpio (not tar).

The different numbers (the /dev/rmt0.1, rmt0.2) will correspond to different densities assigned to that number as well as what actions are performed (such as rewind-on-close, and re-tension-on-open)

The defautls will vary from UNIX to UNIX too.
The commands to change these parametes (and some UNIXes extend these further than others) will vary from UNIX to UNIX.
0
 

Author Comment

by:aleyva
ID: 2008180
The answer I was looking for was more like
:
Special File Name  |Rewind-on-Close   |Retension-on-Open
/dev/rmt*                Yes                      No  
/dev/rmt*.1              No                       No  
/dev/rmt*.2             Yes                      Yes
/dev/rmt*.3              No                       Yes
/dev/rmt*.4             Yes                      No
/dev/rmt*.5              No                       No
/dev/rmt*.6             Yes                      Yes
/dev/rmt*.7              No                       Yes

Thanx and sorry it took so long to respond.
0

Featured Post

Does Powershell have you tied up in knots?

Managing Active Directory does not always have to be complicated.  If you are spending more time trying instead of doing, then it's time to look at something else. For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

My previous tech tip, Installing the Solaris OS From the Flash Archive On a Tape (http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/OS/Unix/Solaris/Installing-the-Solaris-OS-From-the-Flash-Archive-on-a-Tape.html), discussed installing the Solaris Operating S…
I have been running these systems for a few years now and I am just very happy with them.   I just wanted to share the manual that I have created for upgrades and other things.  Oooh yes! FreeBSD makes me happy (as a server), no maintenance and I al…
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

809 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question