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Win NT4.0 Workstation and 95 peer-to-peer network

I have a Windows NT 4.0 laptop running workstation with the Service Pack 3 applied and a Windows 95 machine connected to a small network hub. I can see files on each of the machines in both directions, both have TCP/IP protocol loaded. What I need is to be able to connect from one machine to the other via TCP/IP (I am running IIS on the NT machine) and I want to be able to connect from the 95 machine to view a web page. The web page is composed of a Visual Basic Document, so simply navigating to the html file will not work. I cannot ping either direction, they are both in the same workgroup and can see each other in NetHood. Each has a unique IP address, the rest of the network information is left blank on both machines with the exception of the workgroup name. I have created a hosts file in the appropriate directories with each of the machine nodes and addresses.
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grrickar
Asked:
grrickar
1 Solution
 
mcdoncCommented:
Did you enter a subnet mask into the control panel dialog box where you entered the IP address into?  If not, enter one.  If neither is connected to any other IP network (such as the Internet), any subnet mask is fine as long as they "match".

For example, the first machine should be set up like this:
IP address - 192.168.1.1
Subnet mask - 255.255.255.0

The second should be set up like this:
IP address 192.168.1.2
Subnet mask -255.255.255.0

These are really the only options that need to be entered to make IP work between 2 machines connected to the same hub.

The reason the computers can see each other in Network Neighborhood now is because you are also running IPX or NetBEUI on both machines.  Once the machines can successfully "ping" each other, you can safely remove IPX (unless you're also connecting to a NetWare resource) and NetBEUI.

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grrickarAuthor Commented:
Muchas Gracias Amigo! Couldn't believe that it was that simple.

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