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Win95/setup

Posted on 1998-12-10
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I had win95 loaded, and was installing an on-line banking program from a CD,(my bank) on the banks profile page I hit the wrong key and the program launched without all of my info completed.  I de-installed the banks info and in the process created this error message c:\windows\command\mscdex.exe/10:msscd00 and vmm32.VXD file damaged or missing. I can not get win95 to run...
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Question by:kwhwilliamson
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by:naharri
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Can you boot to a command prompt only or in safe mode (hit F8 when your PC starts to boot).  If you can, edit the autoexec.bat file and rem or remove the line referencing the file MSCDEX.EXE.  This is a real mode driver for the CD ROM.  Windows 95 does not normally need it for the CDROM to work.  If it does for some reason, you will need to reinstall the real mode CDROM drivers anyway.  Let us know if this works.
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by:naharri
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In case you're not sure, you can edit the autoexec.bat file by typing "edit autoexec.bat" at a command prompt.  Look for the line with MSCDEX.EXE in it and type "REM" at the beginning of the line.  Hit Alt-F, X, Y (File, eXit, Yes to save changes).
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by:cecil63
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do you have a 3.5 bootup disk that gives you access to your cd-rom?

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by:snowolfe
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delete and replace vmm32.vxd
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khanson earned 50 total points
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If the error message is telling you that the c:\windows\command\mscdex.exe/10:msscd00 and vmm32.VXD file damaged or missing I would first start with verifying if they are "missing".

Check the hard drive to see if these files are actually there.  If they are present, check then to see if you have an autoexec.bat and config.sys files and if these files are properly pointing to the "missing" files.

If you find the the files are present and if you do have the autoexec.bat and config.sys files, and these files are properly pointing to the so called "missing files", then try copying the files from another computer and placing them in their respective places, then try a clean boot.

If you are not able to copy the files directly from another computer, try having another user e-mail you the files.

I propose this answer because many times when you are loading a third party software program (such as the banking program you were installing), they make modifications to these older environment files.  If you uninstalled the program because there was a problem, there is a possibility that these files were changed, thus confusing Windows 95 which is dealing above autoexec.bat and mscdex and adding the registry into the picture.  Windows 95 is still basically an Operating System, still following some of the older rules ...

Hope this helps.
--Karen
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