Solved

Major Linux installation problems?? HELP?

Posted on 1998-12-12
8
275 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
My machine is a am486dx4 120mhz, 24 megs of ram, a trident svga video card, creative 8x cdrom set a slave, a 1.2 gig connor hd set as master, no modem, no nic, and one floppy.  I have tried to load red hat 4.2, slackware, and caldera openlinux lite.  Each reboot, of each of the three different versions, of the boot image on floppy results in this error:
    boot:
    Loading install........................
    Uncompressing Linux...

    crc error

     -- System halted_

This error occurs when I try and boot from the floppy when it is created with rawrite from the linux cd.  But when I have tried numerous different floppies, that is not it.  I even used a different floppy drive, that is not it either.  The machine runs perfect with msdos 6.22, including the cdrom.  
    The only success I have had is starting the install of caldera openlinux from DOS, using install.bat.  This works throught the complete installation.  When I try and reboot for the first time, the machine gives me the 'NO OPERATING SYSTEM' error.  I guess that has to do with the partitions and the boot program.  I have no idea how to make this work.  Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thank you
0
Comment
Question by:jesse_phoenix
8 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:olvo
ID: 1631879
Try using loadlin that boots from dos, and then rerun the map installer.
Make sure your linux patition is below 1024 cylinder.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:mart010897
ID: 1631880
It's also quite possible that you have some bad RAM or even a bad floppy drive...  The crc error it's complaining about is in the gzipped kernel image that it just loaded raw from floppy disk.  If it works when you boot it off your cdrom, then I have to say your floppy drive is suspect.  Try swapping it with the floppy drive from your other machine, perhaps?

-Mart
0
 

Author Comment

by:jesse_phoenix
ID: 1631881
Yes, but I tried it with two different floppies, many different floppy disks, and the same thing occured.  Could it then, by process of elimination, be some of the ram is bad??
That is the only thing I can think of.  Also, when I create the swap partition on installation, I tell it to create it double the size of the ram.  And when it is created, the swap partition is only 32 mb -- that is 2x 16 mb.  The machine supposedly has 24mb of ram!!  So I think that is the problem.  Let me know if you have any other solutions,  enter them as answer, mart, and I will give you the points.  
Thank you very much for the enlightenment...
0
Master Your Team's Linux and Cloud Stack

Come see why top tech companies like Mailchimp and Media Temple use Linux Academy to build their employee training programs.

 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:kathotia
ID: 1631882
The CD from which you have created the boot image may be bad. Try another CD and check
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:mart010897
ID: 1631883

Jesse--

That sounds definitely like bad RAM.  If i were you (and didn't have any extra RAM lying around) I would try taking out the "24 MB" of ram and putting in 8 MB only... All the RAM can't be bad, and that way you can eliminate the SIMMs that are bad-- and also make the determination that it's bad RAM.  If the first 8MB combination you try doesn't work, try a different set of SIMMs-- you get the idea... that way at least you'll get Linux installed.

kathotia-- Please don't propose answers unless you're reasonably sure that it's an answer to the question.  Your proposed answer isn't very useful or informative, and quite possibly wrong.  It makes it hard for the person who solves the problem to get the credit.

-Mart

0
 

Author Comment

by:jesse_phoenix
ID: 1631884
Mart --
Repost your comment as an answer and I will give you the points.  Kathotia's answer I have rejected, it is not the cd that is the problem at all.  I had a bad 8mb simm.  Thank you for the deductive help Mart.
Again, Mart, repost as an answer and I will increase your points.
Thank you.
Jesse
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
mart010897 earned 150 total points
ID: 1631885
Excellent... glad that worked... here's the previous comments as answer...

Mart

---

Jesse--

That sounds definitely like bad RAM.  If i were you (and didn't have any extra RAM lying around) I would try taking out the "24 MB" of ram and putting in 8 MB only... All the RAM can't be bad, and that way you can eliminate the SIMMs that are bad-- and also make the determination that it's bad RAM.  If the first 8MB combination you try doesn't work, try a different set of SIMMs-- you get the idea... that way at least you'll get Linux installed.

kathotia-- Please don't propose answers unless you're reasonably sure that it's an answer to the question.  Your proposed answer isn't very useful or informative, and quite possibly wrong.  It makes it hard for the person who solves the problem to get the credit.

-Mart
0
 

Author Comment

by:jesse_phoenix
ID: 1631886
Adjusted points to 150
0

Featured Post

Use Case: Protecting a Hybrid Cloud Infrastructure

Microsoft Azure is rapidly becoming the norm in dynamic IT environments. This document describes the challenges that organizations face when protecting data in a hybrid cloud IT environment and presents a use case to demonstrate how Acronis Backup protects all data.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
CentOS/RHEL 7 Linux maillog worldwide readable 2 89
ftp to port 21 4 54
What is the best way to transfer files from and to Linux VNC window? 9 50
expand ext4 on centos 6 5 37
Little introduction about CP: CP is a command on linux that use to copy files and folder from one location to another location. Example usage of CP as follow: cp /myfoder /pathto/destination/folder/ cp abc.tar.gz /pathto/destination/folder/ab…
It’s 2016. Password authentication should be dead — or at least close to dying. But, unfortunately, it has not traversed Quagga stage yet. Using password authentication is like laundering hotel guest linens with a washboard — it’s Passé.
Learn how to get help with Linux/Unix bash shell commands. Use help to read help documents for built in bash shell commands.: Use man to interface with the online reference manuals for shell commands.: Use man to search man pages for unknown command…
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.

828 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question