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DNS Reverse zone and Webmin

Posted on 1998-12-17
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1,377 Views
Last Modified: 2008-03-10
I have setup my DNS zones with webmin.
I've added 3 primary zones : d2i.fr & mg-com.fr and mg-com.com.  
In /var/named, webmin created 3 files : d2i.fr.hosts, mg-com.com.hosts ... that contain my A, NS, MX entries. But i don't know where to put my PTR entries. I tried in the same file but it doesn't work. I also tried to create a file called d2i.fr.rev in /var/named but it doesn't work.
I'm a newbie with Linux Administration. So i'm not sure but i think that webmin create his own files and i don't know where are some of them . Any idea would be welcome. If i 've to forget Webmin, it's not a prob. I use it cause it's easier for a newbie.
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Question by:jacoby
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Expert Comment

by:mcdonc
ID: 1638851
Hmmm... I've never used Webmin, and don't know if you're using BIND 4.9 or BIND 8 on your linux box as a name server daemon, but here are some tips in the case you're using BIND 4.9:

Though it could be elsewhere, BIND 4.9 generally looks for a file named "named.boot" in your /etc directory (e.g. it looks for a file named /etc/named.boot).

Here's the contents of my named.boot file for one of our nameservers:

;---start named.boot-----
; iqgroup.com primary dns
;
directory /var/named
;
; type          domain                          source file or host
cache           .                               root.cache
primary         0.0.127.in-addr.arpa            pz/127.0.0
primary         iqgroup.com                     pz/iqgroup.com
primary         241.106.207.in-addr.arpa        pz/241.106.207
primary         dsgroupltd.com                  pz/dsgroupltd.com
;----end named.boot---

The line that says "directory" indicates where your zone files are.  In your case, it probably reads /var/named.

The zone files are indicated on the following lines.  In my case, the zone files are root.cache, pz/127.0.0, pz/iqgroup.com, pz/204.106.207, and pz/dsgroupltd.com.

What this means in English is that there are five zone files that BIND looks for when it starts:

/var/named/root.cache
/var/named/pz/iqgroup.com
/var/named/pz/204.106.207
/var/named/pz/dsgroupltd.com
/var/named/pz/127.0.0

Your directory locations may differ.  Consult your named.boot file (if BIND 4.9, BIND 8 I dunno).

Each one of these files defines a "zone", which is generally a list of machines in a domain and their IP addresses.  For a regular zone (e.g. iqgroup.com) the mappings are for IP addresses to computernames, and the file looks like this (taken from my /var/named/pz/iqgroup.com file):

;  Servers
;
apocalypse      A       207.106.241.9           ; Primary mail server
cdserver        A       207.106.241.10          ; cdserver
galileo         A       207.106.241.11          ; Anna's SQL server
infoquest2      A       207.106.241.8           ; Novell server
iqgroup         A       207.106.241.12          ; Web server

 and so on. naming all the machines in the domain.

The other files, such as /var/named/pz/127.0.0, and /var/named/241.106.207 are "in-addr" addresses, which map computer names to IP addresses (the reverse of the other files, such as iqgroup.com).  An example, taken from my /var/named/pz/241.106.207 file is as follows:

; Pointers addresses
1       IN PTR  earthstation-gw.iqgroup.com.
2       IN PTR  ns.iqgroup.com.
3       IN PTR  sharon.iqgroup.com.
4       IN PTR  dialup1.iqgroup.com.
5       IN PTR  dialup2.iqgroup.com.
6       IN PTR  dialup3.iqgroup.com.
7       IN PTR  dialup4.iqgroup.com.

Get it?

So the trick is to define the in-addr domains inside the named.boot file and define them.

Take a look also at http://www.dns.net for the "Bind Operators Guide" It explains it much better than my quick explanation.

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Author Comment

by:jacoby
ID: 1638852
Thanks mcdonc, I'm sure it should works very well with BIND4 but it doesn't with BIND8. But as i'm a beginner, i'll take a look at
http://www.dns.net and if i can configure my reverse zone with that, i'll ask you to answer again.
Merry Christmass, Jacoby.
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Accepted Solution

by:
jman112 earned 50 total points
ID: 1638853
If you don't mind doing a little typing use the template at:
http://www.verinet.com/dns/     
I found this and setup dns service on my network with it
just follow the templates and replace names and ip #'s
as needed.
Good luck bind can lead to bald spots....
0
 
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Author Comment

by:jacoby
ID: 1638854
jman112,

sorry about the delay, but i was really busy and had no time for typing :=))))

That's  OK, Thanks.
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