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cd-rewriter

Posted on 1998-12-18
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Last Modified: 2010-04-27
Have a slight problem, a old hitachi cdrewriter, apparently could write on rewritable disks and then they could be used on standard cdroms. But a new yamaha rewriter used rewriteable disks will not  write disks that work on standard cdroms unless they are 32 - 36 speed. Is this correct or is there something else to be setup. plenty of points for this one as it's urgently required. oh, Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year to You.
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Question by:dutchnut
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jhance earned 800 total points
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It all depends on what you mean by "standard cdroms".  The CD-R (recordable) and CD-RW (re-writable) are "standard" format CDROMS.  Theoretically, they should work in ANY CDROM, CD-R, CD-RW, or DVD-ROM drive.  The reality is that CD-R and to a greater extent, CD-RW discs do NOT work in all CDROM drive.  Why, it's the color of the disk media.  If you look at a standard "silver" CDROM, you see an almost perfect mirror.  The contrast between the reflective and non-reflective "pits" on the surface is excellent and give good signal-to-noise ratio on playback.  They work (obviously) on all CDROM drive.

You run into problems with CD-R and CD-RW media.  If you look at them, you will see first off that they are not silver but gold.  This is not a reflective so you loose some signal right there.  You also can see a colored dye which is usually blue or green.  This is the layer that holds the data.  Since it is not 100% on or off like the silver CDROM "pits" you don't get the same signal off of it that you get from a standard CDROM.  Some older CDROM players (most those made before 8X speed CDROMS were typical) have trouble with the smaller signal-to-noise ratio from these discs.  They can't read them without errors.  The newer drive have improved optics and electronics which compensate for the degraded signal.

What's the solution?  Well if you really need to use CD-R or CD-RW discs, you need to be sure that the target systems you are making media for are compatible.
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