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Olivetti Echos P100E Bios Password

My 8 year old was playing with my laptop and set a BIOS password. As usual, he can't remember what it was. I have trieds shorting the battery, to no avail. This computer has a Phoenix Ver. 4.xx bios. Any help out there ?
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mclampkin
Asked:
mclampkin
1 Solution
 
jimatCommented:
Check your motherboard manual or web site. There is probably a way to clear the password with a jumper setting or shorting specific contacts on the board..
 I had this problem and had to contact the manufacturer. I had to remove the keyboard and short a couple of points on the board. Took about 10 minutes.
It will vary somewhat with the manufacturer.
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vikiingCommented:
CMOS circuitry eats so little current that many times a sole short-circuit is not enough, mainly 'cause condensers store a bit of charge. You must remove the battery, and leave the machine unpowered during at least a couple of hours (better if all night), to let circuitry drains the remaining charge.

Perhaps this is not the solution, but sometimes it worked.

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mclampkinAuthor Commented:
I've already tried to short out the battery, which would, in turn, perform the same function as jimat has suggested. I think I need help from someone familiar with this laptop.
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jimatCommented:
According to the tech who answered my call, the contacts he had me short across were the direct link to the CMOS and bypassed the rest of the motherboard.
 Shorting the battery will kill the battery really quickly and may take a much longer time.
Vikiing's suggestion is probably the only alternative. Hope you find someone who knows your particular system.
jimat


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MATTCEICommented:
(1)Start checking out engineering colleges for the 8-year-old.

(2)If this is the type of Phoenix BIOS that automatically goes into CMOS on a hardware error,force one - like physically disabling the floppy drive.

(2)If your laptop is set to boot from a floppy disk: Check around the net for a CMOS save/restore program (I've seen a few around - shareware/freeware),put it on a bootable floppy,write an autoexec.bat to call it at boot to 'restore' an invalid (as in empty,or some other system's) CMOS.This will cause a CMOS checksum error which should in turn force a load of default values,including 'no password'.
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mclampkinAuthor Commented:
I found the solution on the web. I logged into the distributor for the Phoenix Bios in the U.S. They  had a suggestion sheet for this problem. The had diagrams of all the typical Real Time Clock chips, one of which, the Dallas 12885S which my laptop employed. They showed the pin-out and the necessary jumper points to make. I tried this and it worked.
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