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How do I remove the timeout from a telnet session into my solaris box?

Posted on 1998-12-30
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
When I telnet into my solaris box, if I just leave the telnet session idle for a while, it will disconnect. How can I remove that timeout? It takes too much time to reconnect, and I have to administer the server all day long. I think it's something on the solaris box, but it might be something else, I don't know.
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Question by:taotree
8 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:HalldorG
ID: 1812610
Depends on your shell, check the manpage for the shell you
are using
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Author Comment

by:taotree
ID: 1812611
I just searched through the man page on csh and it doesn't talk anything about timeout. I thought it would be something with either ttymon or login, or getty, or something like that having a timeout, but I can't seem to figure out how to change it.
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Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 1812612
how do you telnet in?
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Author Comment

by:taotree
ID: 1812613
I am running linux on my workstation and I collocate a Solaris 2.51 box at an ISP accessible over the Internet. I just run:
telnet domain.name
to telnet in to the server. Currently my connection to the Internet is a DSL line--it would time out whether it was via modem dialup to the internet or the DSL line I just got in.
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:HalldorG
ID: 1812614
csh has parameter called Autologout set it to 0 and it will
not log you out.  The default value is 60 secs
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Author Comment

by:taotree
ID: 1812615
Okay... I tried doing:
set Autologout=0
set autologout=0
setenv AUTOLOGOUT 0

It still didn't work. It still timed out. Any other ideas?
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Accepted Solution

by:
forrestc earned 250 total points
ID: 1812616
Maybe the best way to approach this is to have you figure out what is getting set.  Type the following commands:

   set
   setenv

Each should (depending on your shell) give you a list of the environment variables which are set.

If you find an appropriate value, you can type:

   unset <value>

or, more specifically:

   unset autologout

If this doesn't work, let us know what shell you are using.   If you're not sure, type the following command:

   egrep '^yourusername:' /etc/passwd

You should get a line like:

forrestc:x:119:40:Forrest W. Christian:/home/forrestc:/bin/tcsh

The /bin/tcsh in this example is my shell.

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Author Comment

by:taotree
ID: 1812617
Thank you very much for your help. I already mentioned I think that I was using the tcsh shell on Solaris. We have since, though, moved to Linux and there doesn't seem to be an auto time out now on the shells (bash) so I no longer need to get it figured out.

Thanks anyway!
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