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UNIX based MAPI client to connect to Exchange Server

Posted on 1999-01-06
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Last Modified: 2008-02-26
Does anyone know if there is such a thing as a UNIX based MAPI client that can work with Microsoft Exchange Server?

I know that I can use POP3, but I'd prefer not to!

Paul


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Question by:psiess
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by:jlms
ID: 2008648
Which UNIX are you using?

The dtmail tha comes with CDE can use MAPI (at least in Solaris 2.6)


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chris_calabrese earned 50 total points
ID: 2008649
MAPI is an API (Mail API), not a network protocol.  I believe Exchange uses a proprietary back-end protocol, as well as POP.

If you don't want POP, you'll have to use a genuine Microsoft product to talk to the Exchange back-end.  Luckily, such a beast exists!  See http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/download/unix.htm.
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