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Accessing NT partitions

Posted on 1999-01-07
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Last Modified: 2010-04-20
I would like to mount the partitions on my NT server under Linux so that I can use the Linux backup tool BRU to back them up.  I realise that I need to use Samba but how do I set this up (both on the Linux and the NT side).  Samba is installed on the Linux machine - I assume it doesn't need to be installed on NT as well.  What do I need to do to set up the partitions on the NT side and how would I actually mount the partitions?

Thanks in advance.

Richard
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Question by:lewin
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 1639074
You can mount a linux partition on NT, using  NET USE on NT and Samba on Linux.
You can mount a NT share on linux, using smbmount on Linux while NT has shared the directory.
You also may use smbclient to simply copy files from Linux to NT, or you can use smbtar to backup files from/to Linux/NT.

So please first think about in which direction you want to have which functionaity. The simplest way is to use Linux as server mounted from NT, the other way arround may be more tricky.
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Author Comment

by:lewin
ID: 1639075
What I need to do is mount the NT shared directories on the Linux machine.  I know that I need to use smbmount but I am not sure how I set this up on the NT and the Linux side.  What needs to be configured?
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Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 1639076
NT: share the requested directory, set share permissions to full control for everyone, and NTFS permissions as you like.
Linux: mkdir mountpoint
           smbmount //NTserver/share_name mountpoint -Untuser -Ppassword

That's it.
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:harrys
ID: 1639077
>>Linux: mkdir mountpoint  
>> smbmount //NTserver/share_name mountpoint -Untuser -Ppassword
>>That's it.

In case he has the smb filesystem in his kernel ;-)
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Accepted Solution

by:
alexago earned 200 total points
ID: 1639078
If you want to mount a NT partition (NTFS) on the Linux side you can use the 2.2.x kernel
, enabling the NTFS filesystem driver, or you can use, with a previous kernel, an alpha version of an NTFS filesystem driver.

If you want to read an Linux partitition on the NT side, you can use the Explore2fs utility, an explorer like program that you permit to access (in read and write mode) to a ext2 partition. (http://uranus.it.swin.edu.au/~jn/linux/).

In this mode you can read/write NTFS or ext2 partition on both side.
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Expert Comment

by:bing031398
ID: 1639079
Don't forget the fix to the NT registry if you are using
NT 4.0 SP 3up. I will complain with access denied otherwise
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