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Boot files on different drives on Win 98

Posted on 1999-01-10
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Last Modified: 2013-12-28
I am trying to add another drive to my computer and I want to boot from the new drive but I don't want to remove any programs that are set up on the original drive.  I have my internet account on the original drive.  Anyway I have already put Win 98 on the new drive and changed it to the master drive so it will boot on that drive but I want to be able to boot to the original drive's setup/programs.  I am running System Commander Deluxe  (like Partition Magic) and it says you can put just the boot files of Win 98 on the master drive  and the rest of the files on the other.  Which files tell it where  to get the rest of the information and can I edit those files?
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Question by:jlverry
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by:Mindbender
ID: 1651377
Tell me, does your BIOS support selective booting? It should do, just checking. Also, a new install of Windows 98 will remove previous settings, but to use your ISP account all you should have to do is setup your DUN connection properly. Copy your connection to a disk and then copy it back on the new drive.
I don't know a way to do this, really, except for installing your programs again (without deleting, it should keep any saves you have) on the original drive to put them in the registry, assuming that you deleted your previous Windows98.
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by:jlverry
ID: 1651378
I'm not sure if it has selective booting.  I will try and move my ISP account over.  I haven't deleted anything from the original drive.  There must be something that tells where the rest of the operating system files are located,  if all I had was the boot files on the new drive and the rest of the OS on the other drive it would have to point to that drive somewhere.  
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by:bartsmit
ID: 1651379
The information is read from MSDOS.SYS on bootup:

[Paths]
WinDir=C:\WINDOWS
WinBootDir=C:\WINDOWS
HostWinBootDrv=C

change the attributes to disable read-only and edit these settings then re-enable read-only attribute.
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dew_associates earned 20 total points
ID: 1651380
There's three ways to approach this and each are a little tacky to say the least. First of all, there are no "files" to either change or edit. When you install programs on Windows, whether 95 or 98, registry changes are added and/or modified. Unless your willing to run a compare of your old Win98 registry as against the new one and do one heck of allot of cut and paste, there's no plausible way to do that. Here are your options though.

You can remove the new hard drive temporarily and reinstall the old one as the primary drive (leave the new one out for now) and do a Windows 98 backup. Backup the files right onto the same driveif there's room to do it. Reinstall the new drive as primary and the old as a slave and recover the backup to the new hard drive. The down side will be that you will have to correct all of the startup and program file pointers as they will need to point to the program locations on the old drive in order to function.

The second method would be, as noted by Mindbender, reinstall the software, loading each to their old directories on the slave drive, but this will make the necessary pointers in your new Win 98 installation.

The last would be to copy the startup files and icons from the old install over to your new desktop and then sort out the errors one at a time.
Dennis
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1651381
Dennis,
Please tell me if you think the following method will work by substituting Win98 for 95.
I haven't done it with Win98 yet, but this method leaves the original drive untouched.


IDE HARD DRIVE DUPLICATION

Begin by creating a startup floppy from Win95 with FDISK copied onto it.
Configure CMOS & connect the new hard drive to your Win95 drive as "slave". (Or, you may connect it to the secondary IDE port.)
Using FDISK, create a Primary partition on the new drive.
Boot the computer and run Explorer.  
Right-click on the new drive and select "Format..." from the drop-down menu.
Check the "Copy system files" box to make it bootable, and let Windows format the drive.
From Explorer's "View" menu, select "Options", and "Show all files". (We don't want any files hidden)  This enables copying the 20MB+ of hidden, system, and registry files. (and will maintain the original attributes and long filenames.)
Create a folder on the new drive with the same name as the one where your Win95 files are located. (Usually Windows)
From Explorer's left pane, click on the old drive's Windows95 folder, click Edit, and Select All.
Un-select the file named Win386.SWP if it exists.
(Hold CTRL and click the filename)
Drag and drop all the files selected to the new folder on the new drive.
Next, in the left pane, click on the old drive's icon to highlight it.
Click Edit, and Select All.
Un-select the following files:
     IO.SYS
     COMMAND.COM
     Win386.SWP (if it exists)
     Windows95 folder
(Be certain MSDOS.SYS is selected.)

Drag and drop everything selected to your new drive.
Shutdown Windows when complete, remove the old drive and install the new one in it's place. (Re-configure CMOS)
Boot from the startup floppy and run FDISK to make the new drive's partition active.

Start the computer and your system runs unchanged from the new drive!

Regards,
Ralph
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1651382
It may work Ralph, but I'm not sure how the new Win 98 bios interface will work given that the hard drive info will have changed. Windows 98 doesn't update this info unless the add new hardware wizard is invoked.
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1651383
Hmmmmm,
Maybe deleting the old HDD from Device Manager would force Windows to detect the new drive when it is exchanged?
But then, I guess Windows would just substitute one of it's registry backups........
I gotta try this when I get some time.   :)
Ralph
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1651384
It would make life easier, but then it would put partition magic out of business.
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by:jlverry
ID: 1651385
I'm going to try a few of the suggestions given and let you know what worked.  

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by:bartsmit
ID: 1651386
Dennis, Ralph, I've succesfully copied hard drives using Ralph's procedure both with Win95 and Win98. Both ran fine from the new drive.

To copy NT drives I use Ghost (pre-norton). Partition Magic is good to add OS-es to a machine prior to system cdr.
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1651387
Glad to hear it!
Now, all I need is a batch file..........
Regards
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1651388
Ralph...your good at Dos, go for it!
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by:bartsmit
ID: 1651389
Howabout this one:

@echo off
attrib c:\*.* +a /s
attrib c:\win386.swp -a /s
xcopy32 c:\*.* d:\ /k /a /h /s /e /q
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1651390
Looks good, bartsmit.
It should work after the new drive is partitioned and formatted with /B.
What would you use in a batch file to reboot after FDISKing, in order to do everything at once?
Ralph
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by:bartsmit
ID: 1651391
Ralph, FDISK has no command line options to create or delete partitions (scary !!) so there seems to be little point in incorporating it in a batch file. Win9x goes into nanny mode anyway and tells you to restart after closing it.

The batch file assumes a partitioned, formatted drive. The only way you can do it without user intervention is to use the tools that come with the MS Windows OEM preload kit (OFDISK, OFORMAT) but these are not supplied with the normal distribution.
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1651392
I never looked into it then, but wouldn't Dos 6.xx do the whole thing on a fresh drive from a batch file?
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by:dew_associates
ID: 1651393
Why would you use Dos 6.x Ralph?
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1651394
Up late, huh?  (Me too.)
I wouldn't use Dos.
I was just thinking there was a batch file in it's setup doing unattended disk preparation.

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by:bartsmit
ID: 1651395
No batch file in DOS 6 for FDISK, it assumed that the drive has a partition. After that it will format it and copy the files. A bit like win9x autorun really.
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by:rmarotta
ID: 1651396
I must be getting old.......
The batch file would be autoexec.bat, but it points to a setup.exe file. (If the drive isn't partitioned, 6.22 will do it automatically though.)

jlverry:
Sorry for taking up so much of your space here.

Regards
Ralph
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