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Crimping RJ45 connectors on CAT5 network cable

Posted on 1999-01-24
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Last Modified: 2013-11-09
I am trying to wire a small home network using twisted pair Cat 5 cabling.  I have run the wire from various rooms in the house to a central location in the basement, where my hub will be located.  So far so good.

I purchased a crimping tool and RJ 45 connectors, however I am uncertain as to whether a certain color sequence order must be maintained as to the individual wires when they are stripped and inserted into the RJ45 connector prior to crimping them.  Surely a person can't simply willy nilly stick the end of the CAT 5 cable into the crimp connector, and blindly crimp the connector.  I have seen no instructions or guidelines on whether the colors on the individual wires are important to maintain consistency on all crimped connections.  Example, should I always crimp (from left to right) Orange Stripe, Solid ORANGE, Blue stripe, solid BLUE, GREEN stripe, solid Green, Brown stripe, solid BROWN?

Forgive me if this is a stupid question, but I sense it is important, and yet I've never seen any instructions dealing with this issue.

Thanks.
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Question by:Monroe406
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idt earned 100 total points
ID: 1138059
Monroe,

what you are looking for is EISA Extended Industry Standard Architecture for Rj45 data connectors.  I couldn't find any specs on the web.. looked for a few minutes.  But, this is the configuration I have used for the last 9 years. I believe is EISA.

holding the rj45 with the plastic spring clip away from you;
with the contacts to your right;
that is, the cable exiting to the left;

from the top colors read;

primary(stripe)
----------------
white (green)
green(white)
white(orange)
white(blue)
blue(white)
orange(white)
white(brown)
brown(white)

while some prefer to reverse the blue(white) white(blue, what is very important, is that both ends are crimped exactly the same way.

-iDT
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Expert Comment

by:jhance
ID: 1138060
Here is a reference on how to do it.  There are two commonly used standards for 10BaseT.  EIA-568A and EIA-568B.  Usually the hardware you but is marked for "A" or "B".  Don't mix them or your connections won't work. Some hardware is marked for "A" or "B" and offers both color schemes.  Be sure to follow one scheme or the other.

http://www.milestek.com/technical1.htm
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Expert Comment

by:rkgea
ID: 1138061
Normally you you only have to look that you connect 1:1.
For some further informations you can look at:
http://isis.livingston.com/tech/technotes/... or at
http://yuma.tdyc.com/hwb/...
r.k.

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LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:idt
ID: 1138062
Monroe,

On page http://www.milestek.com/TechReference2.htm#TIA/EIA (jhance), on the top right is T568A wiring method, which confirms by posted arrangement.

The orientation of the diagram, is plastic spring clip away from you, cable lock wedge towards you.

-iDT
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Author Comment

by:Monroe406
ID: 1138063
I believe the wiring details you provided are for the older T568A standard.  Most newer networks are using the T568B standard, which is different:

See http://www.hubbell-premise.com/plugrefr.htm

Thanks also to everyone else who answered!
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