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a error prompt

Posted on 1999-01-26
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
a server prompt the following messages continually:
Jan 18 15:47:32 yc-mail unix: WARNING: /sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@e,8800000/sd@0,0 (sd0
):
Jan 18 15:47:32 yc-mail unix:   Error for Command: write(10)    Error Level: Ret
ryable
Jan 18 15:47:32 yc-mail unix:   Requested Block: 5970880        Error Block: 597
0880
Jan 18 15:47:32 yc-mail unix:   Vendor: SEAGATE                 Serial Number: 9
737K75351
Jan 18 15:47:32 yc-mail unix:   Sense Key: Aborted Command
Jan 18 15:47:32 yc-mail unix:   ASC: 0x47 (scsi parity error), ASCQ: 0x0, FRU: 0
x3
Jan 18 15:47:32 yc-mail unix: WARNING: /sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@e,8800000/sd@0,0 (sd0
):
Jan 18 15:47:32 yc-mail unix:   Error for Command: write(10)    Error Level: Ret
ryable
Jan 18 15:47:33 yc-mail unix:   Requested Block: 2361228        Error Block: 236
1228
Jan 18 15:47:33 yc-mail unix:   Vendor: SEAGATE                 Serial Number: 9
737K75351
Jan 18 15:47:33 yc-mail unix:   Sense Key: Aborted Command
Jan 18 15:47:33 yc-mail unix:   ASC: 0x47 (scsi parity error), ASCQ: 0x0, FRU: 0
x3
Jan 18 15:47:33 yc-mail unix: WARNING: /sbus@1f,0/SUNW,fas@e,8800000/sd@0,0 (sd0
):      
........

Does it means that my harkdisk has a problem? And how to solve it ?

Very thanks!
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Question by:goodmanner
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3 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 2009417
Yes sounds like a harddisk problem (or SCSI controller, raerly).
run fsck on this disk
0
 
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Expert Comment

by:blowfish
ID: 2009418
sd0 is probably your internal drive (yes?).  If you have any external drives, then you may try checking and swapping/replacing your cables and terminator.  If you don't have external drives, then your internal drive may be failing.  If that's the case you'll need to replace it and restore from your last good backup.  
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Accepted Solution

by:
forrestc earned 320 total points
ID: 2009419
The errors which you are getting seem to indicate some sort of SCSI cabling problem.   Generally, you don't get a parity error with a bad block or a failing disk.  (Note that I said generally).

SCSI can be really fickle in a Sun box, especially if you have both internal and external drives.   This seems to be caused by the fact that there is SCSI termination on the motherboard.

Here's what I would do:

(Note:  When I say drives, I include Hard drives, tape drives, and any other scsi devices such as cdroms you may have).

1)  Make sure that everything is set up the "Standard" Way, meaning the way a scsi chain normally works ok.   Remove Terminator Power jumpers from ALL drives (The SUN box will provide termination power in most cases).  This is especially important in external drives which have their own power source as if you don't the two power supplies tend to fight each other and cause weird scsi problems.  Also, remove all the SCSI terminators from every scsi drive EXCEPT FOR the last scsi device (the one farthest from the CPU) on both the internal and external chain.  See if errors dissapear.

2)  If #1 doesn't work, try removing the SCSI terminator from the last drive on the internal chain.   There seems to be some disagreement from the experts regarding whether you need a terminator on the internal drive chain, ESPECIALLY if you only have a single internal device.   The train of thought here is that the internal chain is "Close enough" to the termination on the motherboard to not need it.  

3) If #2 doesn't work, put the terminator back and try shortening the scsi chain.   If you've got a long chain, or poor cables (cost doesn't equal quality) you may just be running into length problems.  

4) Try putting the terminator power back on on one or the other of the last devices on the chain.

5)  Try a different device on the end of each chain (Internal and external)

I could go on and on and on but you get the general gist.   Maybe a good, shorter explanation would be "Play with termination and cabling options until it works".

I wish I could be more specific, such as "remove jumper 0 from disk 1", but SCSI problems just don't work that way.  In fact, SCSI is one of those areas of computers (along with network cabling, etc.) that as long as you do the "right" thing 99.9% of the time everything will work ok.   Its that 0.1% which do things which don't make since that force you to just try everything.

If this doesn't work, or you can't get this going, please follow up.
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