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pointer to function

Posted on 1999-01-26
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Last Modified: 2010-04-02
I have a .h file:

typedef int (*funcptr)();
int f1();
class CSampleClass
{
public:
      funcptr p;
      CSampleClass();
      int f2();
};

In my .cpp file, it is OK for
{
...
CSampleClass a;
a.p=f1;
...
}

But when I have
{
      ...
CSampleClass a;
a.p=a.f2; //I need this.
...
}
it gives me an error:
'=' : cannot convert from 'int (CSampleClass::*)(void)' to 'int (__cdecl *)(void)'

Please help me to solve this problem.
0
Comment
Question by:yingchunli
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5 Comments
 
LVL 86

Accepted Solution

by:
jkr earned 120 total points
ID: 1185177
What you need are member pointers, but they aren't too easy to handle. In your case,

typedef int (CSampleClass::*PSAMPLECLASS_F2)();

CSampleClass a
PSAMPECLASS_F2 pMethodF2 = &CSampleClass::f2;

Then, you can use it like this:
(a.*pMethodF2)();

I admit that this is quite cumbersome... ;-)
0
 
LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 1185178
Also, note that
typedef int (CSampleClass::*PSAMPLECLASS_F2)();
is applicable for every member to 'CSampleClass' that takes no arguments and returns 'int', so
int CSampleClass::AnotherFunction()
{
//...
}
PSAMPECLASS_F2 pMethodF2 = &CSampleClass::AnotherFunction;

is also legal...

Feel free to ask if you have additional questions on this...



0
 

Author Comment

by:yingchunli
ID: 1185179
Thank you jkr. Your solution works. Here I just wonder why you need the
class instance a:
(a.*pMethodF2)();
How pMethodF2 is related to the class instance.

Why *pMethodF2(); does not work?
0
 
LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 1185180
Method pointers work only with an existing instance of a class. This is because
1. they're not real pointers to code, but indices into an object's method table
2. methods are passed an additional, 'inivisible' arguments that represents 'this'. The code of a method is the same one for each object (same location in memory), but the data (i.e. member variables) is stored at different locations.
0
 

Author Comment

by:yingchunli
ID: 1185181
Thank you jkr.
0

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