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BOOT.INI for Win98 on partition 2

Posted on 1999-01-28
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Last Modified: 2013-12-14
Hi,

I would like to add a boot option to boot.ini for win98, which was installed after NT, with the following configuration:

The systems has 1 IDE Disk
1st Partition is NTFS with NT40
2nd Partition is FAT with Win 98
3rd Partition is NTFS for NT

The section for operating systems is currently by default:

[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Server, Version 4.0" /noserialmice=com1
...

I added an entry

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)="Windows 98"

but this don't work. I also tried:

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\="Windows 98"
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\WINDOWS="Windows 98"
D:\="Windows 98"

None of the above did it right, almost when Win 98 was selected I ended up in a trap screen. Changing the active partition between 1st and 2nd with FDISK works.

Could anyone give me a hint, please.
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Question by:Triggy
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6 Comments
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Mirkwood
ID: 1773060
I think the reason is that the first partition is a NTFS partition.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:mbreuker
ID: 1773061
The following syntax should be correct:

[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Server, Version 4.0"
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)\="Windows 98"
C:\="Windows 98"

My first guess as to why this wouldn't work for you would be that you formatted the second partition as FAT32, which the NT boot loader partition does not recognize and therefore, to the boot loader, partition 2 is really partition 3. If this is not the case, it could also be that you had the entry
D:\="Windows 98"
Since Windows 98 does not recognize NTFS partitions, when it tries to boot, it thinks there is only one partition, C:. I am not 100% sure that what result the D:\ would have, but it's worth trying to change.

0
 
LVL 3

Accepted Solution

by:
drcheap earned 100 total points
ID: 1773062
I have tried to do this before...I think the answer "You can't do that..."
I heard from numerous people that for DOS/Win3.x/Win9x to boot, the first partition on the boot device must be of a recognizeable type (FAT16 for any, or FAT32 for 95OSR2 and Win98).  Since it's NTFS, Win98 won't boot.

There is an exception to this rule (see the ... in quote above?)...  I've seen it done before, once, when a friend of mine loaded Solaris, WinNT, and Win98 on the same drive...
The partitions were, in order: UFS,FAT32,NTFS,FAT16   (last one for some files that all could read).  I doubt you want to go installing Solaris just to be able to boot Win98 off of a second partition, so here's my other solution (that I currently do):

Since I don't like Win9x, and only use it on rare occasion, I tossed in a smaller (2GB) hard drive into my machine, installed Win98, then moved it to "D:" and put my big NT drive back in.  When I want to boot to Win98 I simply reboot and go into the BIOS config, tell it to boot off the IDE-1 device instead of IDE-0.  When I want NT again, I just change the boot device back...not as nice as a boot menu, but it works perfectly!

0
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LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Triggy
ID: 1773063
It is possible! Sure not by the NT boot loader itself, but...

It really seems to be a problem for dual booting Win9x and NT when the first and active boot partion is NTFS and Win98 is placed on a FAT partition after that. In other words the NT boot loader might be unable to read the boot sector of the FAT partition, which in my case is second on disk. I didn't spent more time for this to investigate.

But it is possible using a tool I found at ntfaq.com, which is named bootpart

http://www.ntfaq.com/ntfaq/download/bootpart.zip

This free tool reads the boot sector of any partition, writes it to a file and adds the entry for the boot.ini menu. Opposite to its small explanation, I had to activate the FAT partition, create the boot image file BOOT98.BIN then reactivate the NTFS partion. After copying the boot image file from FAT to NTFS as file and adding a entry to boot.ini like

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\BOOT98.BIN="Windows 98"

it really works.

Thanks for comments.
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:drcheap
ID: 1773064
I tried that before my current setup...
Made the boot image, modified boot.ini, tried to use it...no luck.
It made an attempt to load the boot image, and just got stuck when Win98 tried to load.

0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:Triggy
ID: 1773065
I have absolutely no problems with bootpart, except that I had to activate partition 2 and to boot Win98 from FAT to create the image file. This is not as the small readme explains. I copied the image file to the root of partition 1 (NTFS) and it works.
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