Still celebrating National IT Professionals Day with 3 months of free Premium Membership. Use Code ITDAY17

x
?
Solved

Getting Linux/X-win to recognize Dos formatted drive

Posted on 1999-06-23
3
Medium Priority
?
165 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-20
I have a WD 13gig HD. Since the BIOS has the 8.4Gig limit I'm running EZ-Disk on it. I have Linux installed and running on my other HD which is exclusively devoted to Linux. I need to access my 13gig but it does not show up in the list of mountable HD's  in X-Win. Haven't tried mounting from the command line yet but I will. Before I do, I need to know if the full capacity of the HD will be recognized by Linux and if not, will accessing the HD(reading and writing) screw up anything?
0
Comment
Question by:tincze
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
3 Comments
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:crojas
ID: 1634641
Sorry, but there is no posibility to do this using EZ-Disk, this is only for Win9x.
But I'm not sure if you use your disk whithout EZ-Disk you'll be able to access all your HDD.
0
 
LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
gunny051499 earned 400 total points
ID: 1634642
EZ-Disk is a BIOS-extension for DOS. it has nothing to do with linux.

linux uses it's own code to access disks. linux/unix knew how to access disk of this kind of size, when dos/windows didn't even think about this possibility.......

if you have got more IDE-disks, they can be referenced to as /dev/hda (primary master) /dev/hdb (primary slave) /dev/hdc (secondary master) and /dev/hdd (secondary slave).

as root type "fdisk /dev/hdX" (where X stands for the 13 gig disk, see above). at this point you will know if linux has recognized your disk correctly - it will print out that you have a disk that has more then 1024 cylinders (more then 8 gig). at the following prompt type "p" which stands for print and you will see what partitions you have got on that disk and how big they are (including disk geometry). if you are done with that, exit bye typing "q".

create the directory (if you still haven't done this) where you would like to mount the partition. after that issue the following command:

mount -t vfat /dev/hdXY /your/directory

where the XY stands for the thing you get from fdisk (ie. /dev/hdb1 or /dev/hda1).


IT WILL NOT DAMAGE ANY DATA OF YOUR DISK IN ANY WAY.
0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:gunny051499
ID: 1634643
PS: you can include the above in your /etc/fstab (have a look at how to do this by looking at the existing entries in /etc/fstab)!
0

Featured Post

Will your db performance match your db growth?

In Percona’s white paper “Performance at Scale: Keeping Your Database on Its Toes,” we take a high-level approach to what you need to think about when planning for database scalability.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

If you use Debian 6 Squeeze and you are tired of looking at the childish graphical GDM login screen that is used by default, here's an easy way to change it. If you've already tried to change it you've probably discovered that none of the old met…
The purpose of this article is to show how we can create Linux Mint virtual machine using Oracle Virtual Box. To install Linux Mint we have to download the ISO file from its website i.e. http://www.linuxmint.com. Once you open the link you will see …
Connecting to an Amazon Linux EC2 Instance from Windows Using PuTTY.
How to Install VMware Tools in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 (RHEL 6.4) Step-by-Step Tutorial
Suggested Courses

705 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question