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Posted on 1999-06-29
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What is NetBSD and OpenBSD ?

What are the differents among them and FreeBSD ?

Are they free and where can I get them ?

Andrew
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Question by:andrewyu
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19 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

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chris_calabrese earned 0 total points
ID: 2011261
FreeBSD is a spin-off of the original Berkeley Software Distribution version of Unix.  NetBSD is a spin-off of FreeBSD aimed at porting to as many platforms as possible.  OpenBSD is another spin-off aimed at high security.  All three are freely available.  See www.netbsd.org, www.freebsd.org, and www.openbsd.org.
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Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011262
Thank you very much, but, which one is more stable ?

Andrew
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:chris_calabrese
ID: 2011263
Generally OpenBSD is the most stable, since it's the most scrutinized.  NetBSD is the most widely used and has the best network performance, however.
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Expert Comment

by:Asmodai
ID: 2011264
Sorry to have to disagree with you Chris,

but OpenBSD as well as NetBSD as well as FreeBSD are almost perfectly equal in stability. I use all three every day and have not encountered stability differences between the three.

The mean reason in which the various BSD's get divided, mayhaps rightfully so, mayhaps not, is:

OpenBSD - every piece of code gets audited (but easily lends to paranoia at times) plus it runs on a lot of platforms.

NetBSD - runs on almost every platform you can think of, including VAX. It's the one still most close to the original 4.4BSD codebase.

FreeBSD - the most userfriendly to use IMO. It currently runs only on x86 and Alpha platforms.

All three are equally great and you just have to pick the one best suited for you.
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Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011265
Asmodai,

What is IMO ?

But, how about BSDI ?

Andrew
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Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011266
Did NetBSD change their web site "www.netbsd.org" ?

Andrew
0
 

Expert Comment

by:Asmodai
ID: 2011267
No,

however the www.netbsd.org site was down a few times yesterday. Try www.no.netbsd.org or one of the other mirrors.

IMO = In My Opinion

BSDi? What about it? It's not an Operating System, it's the `manufacturer' of BSD/OS, which is like FreeBSD/NetBSD/OpenBSD, but it is commercial.

Regards,

Asmodai
0
 

Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011268
So, do you think the BSDI will be more stable ?

Andrew
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:chris_calabrese
ID: 2011269
As a commercial system, the BSDi folks are naturally more interested in stability and managability than their non-commercial bretheren.
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Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011270
I see ......

By the way, which NetBSD distribution is the best (is there any distribution other than infomagic) ?

Andrew
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:chris_calabrese
ID: 2011271
I don't run *BSD on any of my systems (for historical reasons), so you are now outside the realm of knowledge on the subject (though I am friendly with Rob Kolstad, the founder and CEO of BSDi, so I'll take an extra opportunity to plug BSDi here :-)
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Expert Comment

by:Asmodai
ID: 2011272
Chris,

sorry if this may sound rude, but if you don't use the BSD's on a day to day basis, please don't comment on stability issues from hearsay, thank you. BSDi ain't all that stabler than either FreeBSD, NetBSD or OpenBSD.

Andrew,

There's only one NetBSD distribution in the Linux term of the word. However it is possible to get NetBSD CD's from other vendors. But the contents of these CD's will be either identical or near identical. The sources and the binaries are for sure identical.

Hope this helps,
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Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011273
Actually, I plan to build the website (still thinking about the countents) !

So, I think I will not have anough budget to buy a UNIX machine ! Therefore, I think I will try the free or cheap OS and I think BSD is better than System 5, thus, I will the FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD or BSDI rather than Linux (actually, Linux is not so stable enough) !

By the way, really thank you very much for giving me so much opinions about the BSD !

Andrew
0
 

Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011274
By the way, where can I buy the official distribution of NetBSD online ?

Andrew
0
 

Expert Comment

by:Asmodai
ID: 2011275
There's a link about that on the NetBSD site (www.netbsd.org).

andrew, bsdi (www.bsdi.com) is a company which makes BSD/OS, and that one isn't free. It costs big cash.

If you are outside of the US, it may be hard to get a NetBSD CD-set due to the export controlled cryptocode.

regards,

Asmodai
0
 

Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011276
I know the BSDI is a commercial product and the price is not as low as a WinNTW !

Anyway, thank you very much !

Andrew
0
 

Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011277
For FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD, which one have a overall higher performance ?

Andrew
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:chris_calabrese
ID: 2011278
They're very similar kernel wise, and application wise, so their performance is also going to be very similar.  The BSDI folks have looked very carefully at web-server performance, so I'm guessing they'd be ahead there.  On the other hand, they've also given their changes back to the development community, so I'd guess the free *BSD's aren't too far behind.  You'll probably have to benchmark on your applications and your hardware to get meaningful differences between the flavors.
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Author Comment

by:andrewyu
ID: 2011279
Thank you very much !

Ok, I will try them later !

Andrew
0

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