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How much memory each process is taking?

Posted on 1999-07-15
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
We are running AIX 4.2.1. and having memory problems (fork function failed, not enough memory). We have solved the problem by increasing the page memory. But, Is there a way to find out how much memory each process is using?
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Question by:theta
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9 Comments
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:thoellri
ID: 2011519
Use the "ps -el" command. The column "SZ" is the process's size. I seem to  remember this value has to be multiplied by "512 bytes" to get the real process size. Check "man ps" (seems to be missing on my AIX system).

Hope this helps
  Tobias
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Expert Comment

by:pluim
ID: 2011520
There are several shareware tools to keep track of processor time, memory etc.
One of them is "monitor", download it from:
http://www.bull.de/pub/out/monitor-2.1.6.0.exe
(yes, this is for AIX, despite the .exe extension....PGP verification applied)

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by:ahoffmann
ID: 2011521
top
vmstat
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Author Comment

by:theta
ID: 2011522
ahoffmann,

Thanks for your response, but I can't except it. Top is not for AIX, and vmstat doesn't give me memory used by each process.

I used thoellri's suggestion and it served my purpose. I would like to give thoellri points but I don't know how I can do it, because thoellri hasn't proposed the answer.

THETA.
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Expert Comment

by:thoellri
ID: 2011523
If you like to give me the point (although ahoffmann answer can be considered ok), then you have to reject ahoffmann's answer and I'll post another answer with my original comment.

Thanks
  Tobias
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Expert Comment

by:thoellri
ID: 2011524

Use the "ps -el" command. The column "SZ" is the process's size. I seem to  remember this value has to be multiplied by "512 bytes" to get the real process size. Check "man ps" (seems to be missing on my AIX system).

Hope this helps
   Tobias





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Expert Comment

by:thoellri
ID: 2011525
Huh?
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Author Comment

by:theta
ID: 2011526
Sorry, I don't know why it did this, the onley thing I did was clicked on "Reload" button on my browser to see if  you have posted the answer. Can you post the answer again?


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Accepted Solution

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thoellri earned 40 total points
ID: 2011527
Sure, no problem:

Use the "ps -el" command. The column "SZ" is the process's size. I seem to  remember this value has to be multiplied by "512 bytes" to get the real process size. Check "man ps" (seems to be missing on my AIX system).

Hope this helps
    Tobias
0

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