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Recognizing network drive


BACKGROUND: I have two systems--Win95 and Win98--linked in a peer-to-peer LAN.  I have a third system (a 486) on
which someone has installed the Linux 2.2 Kernel. That system does not have a CD-ROM drive, but it does have an ethernet card.  I also have an ethernet minihub and extra cabling for connecting to the LAN.  

QUESTION: Can the Linux/486 system access the CD-ROM drive
on my Win98 system?  If so, how do I accomplish that?

--Norm
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Norm012797
Asked:
Norm012797
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1 Solution
 
Norm012797Author Commented:

I called this question 'hard' because I know nothing about Linux (my aim is to learn it) and someone who says he knows Linux is sure it can be done, but couldn't tell me how.  Hopefully, you will find the question easy.  As long as you can answer it, you're welcome to the 200 points.

--Norm
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gunny051499Commented:
either use the samba package (program: smbclient) or compile into the kernel smb support and run smbmount.

samba could be of interest to you, since it will emulate a windows-file-and-print-sharing on you linux box.
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Norm012797Author Commented:
OK--

   Using my main machine, I located and downloaded a file called  samba-latest_tar.gz -- which I believe contains the right version of Samba for the Linux Kernel 2.2.  I now have two new problems:

   1) How do I get this file of 2,196,946 bytes over to the Linux machine?  It's too large to fit on a floppy, and there's no network connection yet, since I need Samba in order to network.  (Serious chicken-and-egg problem here.)

   2) How do I "unzip" this particular kind of file--and where?  (On my Windows machine or on the Linux machine, once we get it over there?)

--Norm




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nirsimCommented:
Hi Norm,

  Getting the file over to the linux is the easy part. A usuall installation of linux would install an ftp server, so you can simply ftp to your linux's IP, and upload the file to a home directory of your choosing.
  After uploading, to open the file do the following:

  If the extesion is *.tar.gz or *.tgz do 'tar -zxvf [filename]', this will create a directory, and extract the files. This should be done on the linux machine !
                            ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  Upon unzipping the files, checn the README files and INSTALL file to obtain information regarding the installation of SAMBA. I can tell you this, I know that SAMS publishing have a really simple/good book about operating SAMBA, so if you can get it, it will help you a lot.

Regards,
  Nir Simionovich
  Linux-IL Member
  Artnet Experts Ltd.
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Norm012797Author Commented:
Nir--

   You write:

   ...you can simply ftp to your linux's IP, and upload the file to a
    home directory of your choosing.

Sounds good.  However:

  1) If my linux system has an IP, I don't know what it is or how to find it out.

  2) If I did know the IP, I would not know the procedure for uploading the file.  In fact, the linux commands are so unlike those of DOS, that I can't even figure out how to get a list of existing directories, much less create a new one.  

   What I have is a Linux Kernel 2.2 system with an ethernet card connected via rj45 wire to an ethernet card in my Win98 system.  When I turn the Linux system on, I get the prompt 'norman Login: '.  I then enter 'root' and the password I was given, and I get the message 'You have mail.' followed by the prompt 'norman:~#  '.

   I don't even know how to read the mail it says I have, and there is now way I know to get a listing of all the manual topics.    

   Did I mention that I'm not an expert?

--Norm
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Norm012797Author Commented:

Nirsim's answer looks good, but I am unable to confirm that it will work (See discussion above.)  I therefore accept the answer on faith and grade it C.

--Norm
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