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Posted on 1999-08-02
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Hi.

I have bought Linux Redhat 5.1 from computer store.  I already follow instruction from downloaded docement from Internet for linux installation and follow until this step : - Please below

1. You are asked if you are installing to a New System or upgrading Red hat Linux 2.0 or greater……
Answer  : Install     ( Done )
2. If you are installing for the first time, you need to partition your hard disk with the free space….
Answer  : Don’t know how to do
Remarks: For your information that I have 2 HDD in my computer , First HDD for Windows and second is for Linux installation. Please advised.
3. What is Linux native and Linux Swap partition and how to do it ?
4. What is root partition ?


Please help me to understand step 2 until 4.

Thanks for your help
billy

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Question by:boybilly
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4 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:mrc197
ID: 1629974
When you want to use any hdd you must divide it up into sections called partitions. Even if you want to use the whole hdd as one then you must still create a partition for the whole drive. The partition table then gives the OS information about the hdd boundaries so that it knows where it can write data on the drive. With Linux you must have a least two partitions: one to install it onto and another one which Linux can use as virtual memory (like Windows does with the win386.swp file). The easiest way to get you going would be to create a swap partition of approximately twice the size of your real memory (RAM) of type Linux swap (type 83 I think) and then create another partition with all the rest of the space on the drive for Linux root (type 82 I think but they might be the other way round). By the way the swap partition cannot be bigger than 128Mb but if you have that much memory you shouldn't need avery big swap partition anyway. I think RedHat comes with a partition tool that is easier to use than fdisk so use that if you can (although I can't remember what it's called),  and you shouldn't have to many problems. By the way you will probably want to download some of the books that are available to help with installing and running Linux, do an Internet search for the Linux Documentation Project or you can try getting them from sunsite.unc.edu and many other mirrors.Some of the most useful would probably be the System Administrators Guide, the Network Administrators guide and the Install Guide.
Have fun and persevere!

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Expert Comment

by:blitzx
ID: 1629975
Well a Native Linux partition is where the system is going to be installed, the Swap Partition is for the Virtual Memory, i recommend that you use Disk Druid cause is easier to use than Fdisk, if you have about 64MB of ram you must set your Swap for 128MB but you can't put over 128 MB on the Swap Partition, its recommended that you use 2*Quantity of Ram for your Swap Partition but you can only set up to 128MB, after that in your Root partition you must set / to specify the name of partition usualy is /

Hope it helps

Regards
blitzx

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Expert Comment

by:Recall
ID: 1629976
The RedHat documentation, viewable on the website, has a whole chapter on partitioning free space for Linux, as well as info on all the other stuff you ask about.  
Apart from that, and like mrc197 says, there is plenty more where that came from in the form of downloadable books, howtos, faqs etc.  If you bought the boxed version with manuals from the store, it should all be in there too.

Read lots, be patient, have fun and persevere - it'll be worth it.

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Accepted Solution

by:
arunks080299 earned 60 total points
ID: 1629977
>>2. If you are installing for the first time, you need to partition your hard disk with the free space?.
Answer  : Don?t know how to do
Remarks: For your information that I have 2 HDD in my computer , First HDD for Windows and second is for      Linux installation. Please advised.

RED HAT LINUX HAVE GIVEN A NICE GUI FOR INSTALLING LINUX.FOLLOW THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE
1. CLICK ON THE INSTALL BUTTON
2. NEXT SCREEN WILL BE ABOUT THE PARTITIONING DISK, CLICK ON FDISK
3. IF YOU ARE DEDICATING THE SECOND HARD-DISK COMPLETELY TO LINUX THEN SELECT THE APPROPRIATE DISK-PARTITION AND DELETE IT.
4. NOW YOU HAVE SOME FREE SPACE, FOR LINUX YOU NEED TO CREATE TWO PARTITION ONE FOR SWAP AND OTHER FOR ROOT.
5. THERE IS A BUTTON AT LEFTMOST BOTTOM "ADD...", CLICK ON IT AND YOU WILL GET ANOTHER WINDOW. SELECT THE LINUX SWAP TYPE , SPACE REQUIRED IS APPROX. TWICE THE "RAM".
6. ADD ANOTHER PARTITION WITH REMAINING DISK SPACE, SELECT LINUX NATIVE. PUT MOUNTING POINT AS "/"
7. AFTER SETTING ALL THESE DON'T FORGET TO SET MOUNTING POINTS FOR THE OTHER WINDOWS PARTITIONS. FOR THAT GO TO APPROPRIATE LOCATION (MOSTLY AT THE TOP , DOS PARTITION). PUT THE CURSOR THERE AND PRESS ENTER. SET MOUNTING POINTS AS /C OR ANYTHING YOU LIKE. IT JUST CREATES A DIRECTORY /C WHERE YOU CAN SEE FILES OF WINDOW PARTITION.
8.PRESS OK AND CONTINUE.


>>4. What is root partition ?
UNLIKE WINDOWS LINUX HAS ONE TREE TYPE FILE STRUCTURE. ROOT OF WHICH IS DIRECTORY CALLED "/". AND THIS IS THE MOUNTING POINT FOR THE ROOT PARTITION.

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