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Overclocking CPU?

Posted on 1999-09-20
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Last Modified: 2010-04-27
I have an older Compaq Presario 4505, I recently upgraded the Pentium 166mmx cpu with an OEM Pentium 233mmx. This is the fastest chip my motherboard will support. A friend of mine said I could overclock the new 233mhz cpu to 266mhz. Is this true? If there are no adverse consequences in overclocking, any tips on how to do it would be appreciated.

Thanks,
rcloyd
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Question by:rcloyd
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7 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:BLackearl
ID: 2061666
Overclocking can work, but it comes with a cost.  The cpu's speed in not ment to be overclock in the first place, so the it will be a little faster but it won't really be as fast as a 266mhz. In the long run you do run the cpu's life span, which is costly.
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Expert Comment

by:jhance
ID: 2063009
I'll have to disagree with Blackearl here.  

There is no evidence that overclocking reduces the _USEFUL LIFE_ of a CPU.  Under normal circumstances a CPU will last virtually forever.  10, 15, 20 years, no problem.  OK, so you overclock and reduce the life by 25%.  So it only lasts 7.5 years.  Who cares????  Do you run any 7 year old CPUs now?  Think, what was state-of-the-art in 1993?  We're talking 386 at 33MHz. Do you think you'll care about your silly 233MHz Pentium chip in 2006?  Doubtful.  More likely you'll be trying to overclock your new Pentuim XII to 3.5GHz and be cooking your lunch at the same time with the radiated microwaves....

Of course, there is another problem here.  You said your motherboard won't support 266MHz anyway.  So how are you going to overclock?  Unless you're planning on hacking away at your motherboard with an X-Acto knife and a soldering iron, I think you're out of luck!
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Expert Comment

by:jhance
ID: 2064624
I'll have to disagree with Blackearl here.  

There is no evidence that overclocking reduces the _USEFUL LIFE_ of a CPU.  Under normal circumstances a CPU will last virtually forever.  10, 15, 20 years, no problem.  OK, so you overclock and reduce the life by 25%.  So it only lasts 7.5 years.  Who cares????  Do you run any 7 year old CPUs now?  Think, what was state-of-the-art in 1993?  We're talking 386 at 33MHz. Do you think you'll care about your silly 233MHz Pentium chip in 2006?  Doubtful.  More likely you'll be trying to overclock your new Pentuim XII to 3.5GHz and be cooking your lunch at the same time with the radiated microwaves....

Of course, there is another problem here.  You said your motherboard won't support 266MHz anyway.  So how are you going to overclock?  Unless you're planning on hacking away at your motherboard with an X-Acto knife and a soldering iron, I think you're out of luck!
0
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Expert Comment

by:Adam Leinss
ID: 2064684
Well, this assumes that overclocking for a short period of time is okay.  This hasn't been proven or disproven, it is unknown.  What is known is that overclocking a chip can cause electro-migration and other fun stuff.  If the machine is not mission critical, you just want it for playing games and doing nothing important, then by all means overclock you little heart out.  However, if you value your CPU, I would stay away from overclocking.  Done wrong once, you chip is donesy
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Expert Comment

by:compmed
ID: 2065316
Like aleinss says, overclocking is a delicate art.  Get all the information you can before you start messing with your hardware.  A good place for general information is:

http://www.tomshardware.com/overclock.html

I've found Tom's Guides to be factual and easy to understand - check it out and let me know what you think.

CM
0
 

Expert Comment

by:ranner
ID: 2065619
If you aren´t using your machine for something critical,
I would give it a try.
The frequency consists of two parts:
#1 board frequency (should be 66MHz)
#2 the multiplier (with your 166MHz CPU *2.5)
You won´t be able to change the board frequency (due to Compaq-reasons). But you can probably change the multiplier.
Now your CPU is running with *3.5.
Your jumper-settings are now the same as for a P100 CPU.
When you change them to the P133 settings your system should
work with 266MHz.
Maybe the BIOS won´t show the correct clockrate, but you can
use a benchmark-prog to verify the change.
Due to high Intel production standards there should be no problem to achive 266MHz without any troubles.

I used this method on my notebook and it runs for about a year with 266MHz without a problem. Although over-heating is much more dangerous in a notebook.

Rudi
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LVL 32

Accepted Solution

by:
jhance earned 60 total points
ID: 2065663
rcloyd,

Why do you keep rejecting proposed answers without comment?  Since I must assume you rejected my answer by mistake, I'll have to post it again:

I'll have to disagree with Blackearl here.  

There is no evidence that overclocking reduces the _USEFUL LIFE_ of a CPU.  Under normal circumstances a CPU will last virtually forever.  10, 15, 20 years, no problem.  OK, so you overclock and reduce the life by 25%.  So it only lasts 7.5 years.  Who cares????  Do you run any 7 year old CPUs now?  Think, what was state-of-the-art in 1993?  We're talking 386 at 33MHz. Do you think you'll care about your silly 233MHz Pentium chip in 2006?  Doubtful.  More likely you'll be trying to overclock your new Pentuim XII to 3.5GHz and be cooking your lunch at the same time with the radiated microwaves....

Of course, there is another problem here.  You said your motherboard won't support 266MHz anyway.  So how are you going to overclock?  Unless you're planning on hacking away at your motherboard with an X-Acto knife and a soldering iron, I think you're out of luck!
0

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