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Power connector cable fried

I installed a Sony CRX120E CD-ReWritable. I turned the PC on and HOLY SMOKE, literally! The 2 cables very thin - black & red) that melted, are part of the connection from the DC Power Connector in back of the CD leading to the sound card. Now the monitor shows nothing when I start the PC. Am I in trouble or just...? <g>

Thanks for any advice in advance.
 
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ehundrieser
Asked:
ehundrieser
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
Edited text of question.
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chewymonCommented:
Ouch!  I hope you didn't mistakenly connect the fine digital cable from the CD-R to the power.  From your description of the cable, it seems poassible.  The fine, two wire lead is usually a didgital cconnection from the CD to the motherboard.  The power is the thicker set with 3 or 4 wires and is the same as the connections to the HD.
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your reply. Here's a clarification of my initial question.

The 2 thin (fine) wires that I described are actually part of the set of wires from the power supply [Y,B,B,b,R,r]. Capital letters represent wires that lead from power supply to DC Power Connector. Lower case letters represent the 2 BURNED wires that are part of that set and do not lead directly from the power supply - but but are present at the plug that enters the DC Power Connector of the CD writer.

On second thought, I believe those wires were not plugged into the sound board, but were tied around the power supply wires, to use for something else? Those are the 2 thin wires that melted!

Could I safely try to use the Emergency Startup Disk to restore the system?
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chewymonCommented:
Sounds like the miniplug set that is used for floppies.  Most power supplies have 2 or 3 sets of power wires tied together to use in different devices. Looks like you had a major short if they were not connected to anything.

To start with disconnect from the CD-R, check carefully and see if this whole set of wires has any bare spots showing and/or touching anything else.

If you are absolutely sure that no short exists, try rebooting without the CD-R.

You can try the emergency disk, but until you get something on the moniter during POST, it probably won't work.

Depending on your level of comfort in tearing down your system; I would dissconnect everything except the RAM, CPU, video, and HD.

If you get a POST screen, we can go from there.
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the info.

The 2 thin wires [b,r] are definately damaged (melted plastic around the wires). Proceed with dismantling?

Erik
Los Angeles

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chewymonCommented:
Can you be sure that there is no short between the 2 wires?  If not, you have to solve that first.  If you have wiring experience you could cut them back to good wire and tape them off.  If you don't, you are probably looking at a shop job.
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
chewyomon,

How would I identify that there's a short? The plastic on both thin wires is totally mangled/burned (20.5' in length) from beginning to end and the wires appear a bit shocked.<g>

The black wire sits in slot #3 of the DC power cable plug; the red wire in slot #4. At the opposite end is a small plug with 2 leads, that looking back at this fiasco, was plugged into the CD-W's 'Audio Out Ground Connector' in error.

It seems to me that I'd be able to remove the two wires and replace them with new ones?
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 100
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chewymonCommented:
If you plugged the power lead into the ground connector, you built a dead short.  The CD-W might be toast.  If you wish, you can clip the two wires that burned as close as possible to the main connector.  Or you might be able to pull them out of the connector.  You really don't need them as they are most likely a power lead for a second floppy drive.  Then check the remaining wires for any signs of bare copper showing or fusing together of the wires.  

I would still try and get the box running with minimal devices to make sure nothing else is fried.  Power to ground shorts can travel in unexpected ways depending on the layout of the circuits.

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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
Thanks chewymon!

I am now convinced that we're on the same wave-lenth, as far as what wires were damaged. Sometimes I find it difficult to describe the innards of a computer, using teche language. Therefore, I'm cautious in proceeding to the next step.

As you recommend, I will pull the previously mentioned wires out of the connector. That'll be the easy part...
None of the thicker, main wires, are damaged.

Next, I will pull the cards, disconnect the floppy, but leave the RAM, CPU, Video and HD connected. Please let me know if that's OK, or if I've forgotten something.

I'm appreciative of your continued assistance!

Erik
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chewymonCommented:
That's what I would do.

If you get a POST you're on the way.  If not, you may have more problems.

If the box POSTS, but won't load windows, you can reconnect the floppy and try your emergency disk.
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
I disconnected everything, except RAM, CPU, Video, and HD. No results. Still a blank screen.

I need to know what 'If the box POSTS' refers to.
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
Three items to ponder:

[1]  The HD appears to be spinning. When I hit enter its responds with spinning noise. (Screen remains blank)

[2]  When I turn the computer on, I hear one long beep and one short beep. Any significance?

[3]  Would it make any difference to test it with a different video card (which I don't have)?



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chewymonCommented:
The POST stands for Power On Self Test.

That is the information that shows up when you first turn on the box (computer).  Do you get anything when you firs turn on the machine?

1 long beep, 1 short beep usually means a system board problem.  Don't panic yet.  It is possible you knocked something loose.

The fact the HD spins up is good.

Check and reseat your RAM and sll connections.

The CPU is probably good, or you wouldn't get any beeps.

The video card might just need reseating.

If you have an onboard video chip, you can try removing the video card and use the onboard.  you won't get great resoultion, but you can troubleshoot the system.
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
So far, so good. It's running after all the diagnostic steps. I think reseating the RAM and Cards may have had something to do with it kicking on. And to boot, the CD-Writer turns on as well!
The CD-W tray slides out ok. I still need to set it up... hopefully no surprises there.

With regard to the CD-W, the sound cable at one end has a small white and a larger black plug.

One the sound card, I see [1] black and [1] white connector next to each other, and [1] white connector not too far from the other two. Do I plug in both or just one of them?

Thanks


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chewymonCommented:
Great! We're almost there.

With regard to the sound cable, colors don't help me much.  Eapecially since I am not very knowledgeable about CD-RWs.  What most CD-ROMs have is a small digital cable and a larger analog cable for different types of sound.  If you have the sound card documentation, it whould tell you which is which.  If not, what kind is it?  I can probably find a reference page.
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chewymonCommented:
Late night brain fade.  The digital connection goes to the motherboard for data.  The analog goes to the sound card for sound.  It is possible that your particular drive has dual connectors for different types of cards.  Check the documentation that came with the drive.  I would expect that you would need only one.  Sort of like the extra connector on the power lead.
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ehundrieserAuthor Commented:
Thanks very much for all your help!

Erik
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