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Top level folder?

Hi,
I finally installed ie5 on my windows 98 machine.  Now when I run scandisk, I get the message that scan disk can't complete because of the error that "the top level folder is full.  Delete some files and run scan disk again."
What is the top level folder on my C drive?  The first folder is Adobe Acrobat.  But it's the same as always.  And there's over a gig of space on my c drive.  What is going on?
Thanks
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mcbroom1
Asked:
mcbroom1
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1 Solution
 
vmvCommented:
Top level folder is a root of the disk, where is the autoexec.bat, config.sys files and your Adobe Acrobat folder
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mcbroom1Author Commented:
autoexec.bat etc. are in the root of C drive.  Only new folder in there is Windows Up date
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billd1Commented:
This behavior can occur if you are running ScanDisk with the Automatically Fix Errors option enabled and a file name (including the file's full path) exceeds 259 characters.
Run ScanDisk with the Automatically Fix Errors option disabled. When ScanDisk
encounters the same file, it will prompt you repair the error, delete the file, or ignore the error and continue.

 
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mcbroom1Author Commented:
Which of these options should I choose then?
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gothickCommented:
Depends on which file it is!

Seriously, I'd run it, ignore the error, but note the file name (I'm hoping it's intelligent enough to tell you the file name) and find out where the file is, what it is, and whether there's more than one of them.
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dew_associatesCommented:
McBroom, try this.

1. Click Start, Programs, Accessories, System Tools.

2. Now choose Disk Cleanup.

3. There will be anywhere from 3 to 5 boxes to be checked, check the all and run disk cleanup.

4. Next, open Windows Explorer.

5. Drill down to this directory:

\Windows\Temporary Internet Files

You will see a few cache folders and then a set of IE5 cache folders below that.

Open each cache folder and delete the contents, including the IE cache folders.

Now restart the system and then run scandisk and let us know how you make out!

Dennis
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Asta CuCommented:
Perhaps this will be helpful in your troubleshooting efforts and regards - Error Messages When Windows 98 Is Installed in the Root Folder.

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q194/3/61.ASP

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mcbroom1Author Commented:
Dennis, I tried your disk cleanup and deleting temporary Internet files and restarting system, but still got same error message
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dew_associatesCommented:
That's okay McBroom, but it is the place to start.

Next,

1. Use your Ctrl, Alt and Del keys to open the program manager.

2. Close all running programs except for SYSTRAY and EXPLORER.

3. Now run scandisk.
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harley47Commented:
try this shutdown and restart into dos mode. from the c promt type "dir" without the quotes. Look to see if a lot of the files that scroll by are named File0001.chk.  If you have a lot of these files type del *.chk.
reboot into windows and run scandisk.


Bill
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bparnesCommented:
Harley47 is on the right track here. There is a limit to the number of files that can be in the root (top level) folder of a drive. If you repeatedly run SCANDISK and save the debris if finds, you can eventually exceed the limit by having too many of the *.chk files. Since it appears you can still use your computer in Windows you can do the following.

Double click on My Computer, then double click on your C: drive. Look at the files that show up in that view. Very likely you will have a bunch that begin with "file" and end with ".chk". You can safely delete every one of them by highlighting them all then going to the file menu and selecting Delete.

It is possible that something else is depositing a bunch of files in your root folder, but there's no point in exploring that until you tell us if the above solves your problem.
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mcbroom1Author Commented:
No .chk files in C
The only thing new in C is the Windows upgrade folder from installing ie5
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dew_associatesCommented:
McBroom, have you tried the procedure I layed out for you?
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mcbroom1Author Commented:
Yes, didn't work
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dew_associatesCommented:
McBroom, billd1 posted this earlier, did you follow it as well?

"You are running ScanDisk with the Automatically Fix
Errors option enabled and a file name (including the file's full path) exceeds
259 characters.
 
Run ScanDisk with the Automatically Fix Errors option disabled. When ScanDisk
encounters the same file, it will prompt you repair the error, delete the file,
or ignore the error and continue.
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mcbroom1Author Commented:
No, because I never got an answer of which of those options to choose--ignore, repair, etc.
Which should I choose?
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dew_associatesCommented:
Delete the file McBroom!
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mcbroom1Author Commented:
Thanks guys.  I ran it without automatically fix errors.  It was a long file name in those temporary Internet folders.  I had deleted the contents of those folders as instructed yesterday but that didn't work.  This did.  I deleted all those files and scan disk finished and said it found errors and fixed them.
Thanks :-)
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dew_associatesCommented:
McBroom, I'll post an answer with reference to the above. I will also share points with whomever you desginate and in the amounts you designate.
Dennis
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dew_associatesCommented:
The above issue was resolved through multiple solutions from several parties above. Ultimately, the PC has been cleaned of old files and files with extended naming conventions that caused Scandisk to fail.
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mcbroom1Author Commented:
Thanks, and please share points among all of you
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dew_associatesCommented:
Done!
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Asta CuCommented:
Great, thanks.
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billd1Commented:
Glad to help out!
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