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Boot problem...386 w/Win3.1

Old 386 boots with Keyboard error, Press F1...no reponse. Have replace batteries, tried a different keyboard and used boot floppy...no luck. Suggestions?  Thanks.
John Eargle
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lujon
Asked:
lujon
1 Solution
 
fozyCommented:
Try to deactivate the keyboard in the bios....it would still work...but it would not notice the error..
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RoadWarriorCommented:
fozy

If he can use the keyboard at all he can't get into bios!

lujon

It sounds like either the keyboard fuse on the motherboard has blown or that your keyboard controller is dead. Many motherboards have a fuse soldered into the 5v power line to the keyboard socket, this is usually marked as F1 on the board and is physically close to the keyboard socket. If you see no lights on your keyboard when you power the system on (the 3 lights do not flash at boot, and you can't switch caps lock or num lock on) then this is the likely culprit, test it with a VOM, multimeter, continuity tester or similar. If it does not pass a current it has blown. I think the value of these fuses is about 2.5 Amps, so if you can find a replacement you can solder a new one in, but myself I usually just bridge them with a bit of wire. If you don't have soldering equipment, you can separate a single strand of wire from a stranded cable, and post one end under one side of the fuse and wrap it around tight a few times, then take it along the fuse and do the same the other end, this will usually suffice to get the board working. The connection may deteriorate over time so you may find yourself needing to rewrap it every year or so. When you find someone with a soldering iron they can just solder that wire on for you.

regards,

Road Warrior
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RoadWarriorCommented:
if I could use the keyboard at all I wouldn't make silly mistakes ! :-)

that should read....
fozy

If he can't use the keyboard at all he can't get into bios!
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lujonAuthor Commented:
Thanks, fozy...will look at the fuse in the socket.

John Eargle
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UNIXCommented:
Hi Guys
Sounds like a plan to use a very thin wire, and not to use it for a long time.
Fuses are not al the same, you have the slow blow ones and fast burn ones [better protection] as it will blow faster than a slow blow unit.
The wire should be used in an emergency, to get your pc going and go to radio shack and find a fuse that is used for your MoBo I have seen fuses that looking at them you can't see any conection in the glass at all, but taking a reading will show it's good. But with the wire you are using the wrong gauge 100% of the time.
I am saying this as I have seen this hotwire cheat do more damage than good.
The fuse element in most cases is not made out of copper thus are slow blow [burn is more like it] as the wire will overheat and burn out rather than pop again if there is a short or any other problem.
Just my 2ยข worth.
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lujonAuthor Commented:
Thanks, UNIX, but I've gone ahead and done the most sensible thing....junked it! I'm having enough trouble with my 3 year old 400mHZ and wonderful Win98ME...too much software...gets its feet tangled.
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