Where to install new apps?

In general, what is the recommended directory and/or subdirectory to install new applications?

I recently installed StarOffice 5.1 from a CD-ROM setup routine that set the default installation address at /home/user/soffice. However, I have read elsewhere that applications should go below the /usr/local directory, or in the /opt directory.

Is there any advantage in terms of hard disk access or file management that recommends one directory over another?
tarenxAsked:
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TYoungCommented:
It depends on how you have your hard drive(s) set up. If you have more space on one partition, then use it. Otherwise, it is usually a good idea to use /usr/local/bin because it is by default in the the PATH environment variable.

The main decision is entirely up to you, but it is a good idea to make a place for them, and stick with it, so you are not searching for your program installations all the time.
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EatEmAndSmileCommented:
Usually, you should not divide your hard drive in various partitions, one for each directory. This is something stuypid that RedHat (I don't recommend using RedHat) setup does. It creates many partitions when just a single partition for the ¨/¨ root directory would be the best option. This way your disk space can be dinamically used.

 Common applications would go under /usr/local, as games, web servers, sql servers, etc... But applications such as KDE and StarOffice came out to have another default directory, that would be ¨/opt¨ (optional). I think it's a good way to organize things, as these applications are really optional and really don't fit with the other applications. Maybe because they take a lot of disk space.

 Good luck!
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tarenxAuthor Commented:
Thanks TYoung for good general housekeeping strategy.

EatEmAndSmile - I appreciate your thoughts on disk partitioning, and the /opt directory for optional apps.
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EatEmAndSmileCommented:
Ok! Use it well... :)
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TYoungCommented:
:-)

I only have 2 partitions on my RedHat (awesome, btw) computer. One main root (/) partition, and a swap partition. EatEmAndSmile is right about the partitioning.
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