HARD DRIVE REPLACEMENT

I PRESENTLY RUN WITH A 6GB HARD DRIVE AS "C" DRIVE.  I WOULD LIKE TO REPLACE THAT WITH A LARGER "C" DRICE, AROUND 12-14 GB AND USE THE 6GB DRIVE FOR PICTURE STORAGE.

HOWEVER I WANT TO COME UP ON THE NEW DRIVE CLEAN AND PURE.  I'LL COME UP AS A NEW PC WITH WINDOWS 98 AND RELOAD ALL MY PROGRAMS.  QUESTION IS CAN I THEN READ THE DATA OFF THE OLD C DRIVE.  ONCE I GET ALL THE DATA I'D REFORMAT THE OLD C AND USE IT FOR STORAGE.  THE OLD C IS RUNNING W95 AND I HAVE HAD A FEW SOFTWARE PROBLEMS WITH HANG UP'S.  OK NOW BUT I'D RATHER START CLEAN AND PURE.

IS THIS CRAZY?  

BUD MALEY
mjmaleyAsked:
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CyberNerdConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Bud,

I see that your fear is that your new hard drive with win98 may conflict anyway with your old win95 if you keep your old hard drive as d drive.  You will not have any problem at all because when your system boots up it goes through a sequence called POST and motherboard is designed such a way that it only recognize your primary hard drive as your first boot partition.  Hence, your system treats your old d drive as nothing more than a extended partition.  Once you have completed your task (installing win98 to your new hard drive and making your old c as a d drive) you can freely tranfer or copy files between two hard drives without any problems.  Let me know if you have any additional questions if you wanted me to clearify.
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ggilmanCommented:
Not crazy at all, sounds quite logical. Should work just fine. Not really sure what other answers to give you since it sounds like you know what you're doing but here are some pointers, most of which you probably already know:
1)To add a second drive, there is a master-slave relationship if you use the same cable. Master is C: and slave is D:. You will have to change a jumper on your current "C" to make it a slave. If you use a different channel (cable) for the second drive, each should be stand-alone or master, depends on HD manufacturer
2) You're not really going to be able to run most Apps from the old "C" when you put the two drives on but according to what you are looking for, it doesn't sound like that's a problem. Just going to copy data files from "old C" to "new C", reformat "old C" and copy some of the data files (pics, docs, etc...) back to "old C", right?
3) When you get the new drive installed you will have to run FDISK to partition it first and then FORMAT to format it. Just be careful to get the "new" drive and not the "old" one because a mistake here will wipe out our old data.

As for your sanity everything sounds perfect to me. I've done the exact same thing before.
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BrianWrenCommented:
It's not crazy.

To do this you could change the jumpersettings on the existing drive to make it a slave, and set the jumpers on the new drive to make it a master, (as opposed to single).

Put them both on the same channel, (make sure that your Setup in CMOS is set properly to see the drives--autodetect if you can).

Your new drive will be c:, the existing drive will be D:

Transfer what you like then from D: to C:

(If your CD is currently D:, it will be boosted to E:, and you shortcuts, etc., will have to be modified accordingly.)
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CyberNerdCommented:
How much do you know about FDISK and configuring your CMOS for new hard drive?  Do you want to keep your old programs into your new hard drive if you can transfer all the data with relatively easy without getting any error or hang ups?  There are many ways to accomplish your task. ggilman and BrianWreb are not incorrect but I think we need to know more about your skills with computer in order for me to give you precise answer to your question.  For instance, do you know how to do above solutions presented by ggilman and BrianWeb?  Are you comfortable with FDISK and CMOS configurations? Do you know about disk imaging etc..?
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mjmaleyAuthor Commented:
A little bit about me:  Been in computers since 1964.  At that time it was main frames.  Western Electric.  Installed, tested and configured major telephone systems. Worked with Bell Labs for 2 yrs developing, testing, installing a new Operator system.  Since 1979 I was in sales.  Sold first 3B systems in country.  Sold first AT&T PC's in country.  Have since retired, 1989, worked till 1994 teaching and writing system courses for another Telephone company.

What I'm saying is I'm not a stranger to computers and the way they think and operate.  My biggest problem is my involvemnet now is running applications.  I've started a small business but I rely on a purchased Mail Manager Package and some of the best software packages, Microsoft Office, Corel Draw, Photopaint, Quark,,,,etc.

When I go to improve my operating equipment, I built my own earlier this year, I always have questions and I'm never sure where to find the answers.  I'm sure I can handle most all installation problems, I just need some guidance.

Hope I didn't bore you.  Just trying to tell you where I'm comming from.  Thanks for your interest and help.

Bud Maley
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CyberNerdCommented:
Bud,

That is quite a profile you have.  I assume that you know all the recent computer lingos and terms so I can skip all the crap go directly to bulls eye, I hope :).  Just like Brian and Ggilman suggested, you have to install your hard drive either on a same cable (primary IDE slot in your motherboard) or secondary IDE slot.  If you choose to install it into your primary make your new hard drive as a slave and your old hard drive as master.  If you do this your old hard drive=c: and new hard drive=d: just like ggilman said.  Thereafter, format your new hard drive as same fat system as your old hard drive, and boot up your system.  Once, your system is botted, go to start, run, and type command to go into 32 bit dos window. At your C:\ prompt type "copy c:\*.* d: /h/i/c/k/e/y" (excluding quotes).  You shall see all your files from c: copying into your new hard drive (d: drive) you have recently purchased or planning to purchase.  This copy method is in 32bit mode so it really images your old c: into your new hard drive d:.  Afterwards, replace your new hard drive as your master and your old hard drive as slave and boot it up.  At this point you may still encounter problems.  First, you may not boot up at all because of hard drive model and make. If your hard drive does not boot up just boot up with your boot disk and type sys c: from your a: prompt, and boot up your system.  Once you are able to boot up with your new hard drive you may want to replace drivers because sometimes 32 bit copy corrupts your driver files such as your video card, sound card and your modem, but they are easy to replace.  You also mentioned that you are having some hang ups and sort from your old OS.  You may be able to fix this problem relatively easy if you just reinstall your OS from newly transferred hard drive.  Now my solution here does not require any third pary vendor application so it is all free and available at your disposal; hence, i am recommending above solution eventhough there are more ways to accomplish your task.  Good luck.
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mjmaleyAuthor Commented:
Sorry, maybe I wasn't too clear on my original question.  I want to come up on my NEW hard drive as the Master.  Load it with W98 second edition. Reinstall my applications, Micro Office, Corel 9, ....and so on.  Then when up and running I'd like to introduce my OLD "C" drive as drive "D",(note this drice has W95 and my applications and data) I would then want to move all aplicable data from the OLD drive to my New drive.  Once done I would then wipe the OLD drive clean and use it for data storage.  I guess the question boils down to how will the system react, this is when it is up running W98 on the new drive, what will happen the first time it sees the OLD drive with the old operating system on it?  See what I mean?  Will the system get upset?

Hope I'm a little clearer with my question.

Thanks,   Bud Maley
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mjmaleyAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 200
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mjmaleyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help.  Don't be surprised if you see me back again.

bud
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