Installing Linux on Gateway PCs

I am trying to install the Linux Mandrake 6.1 distribution on my brand new Gateway but always find myself running into a wall. The installation program fails to identify my hard drive. I have partitioned the drive using Partition Magic and have a $ GB partition that Linux shud see but does not. My hard disk is an Ultra ATA harddrive which has a SCSI controller from Promise Technologies. Any suggestions ??
bytewizAsked:
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foxrConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Promise says that redhat will be supporting linux later this year. they are
working on a driver right now.  They are currently not supported.  If you pass this command at you can try this at the Boot: promt
 assuming your address are the same

linux=ide2 0x01c0,0x1016

http:\\metalab.unc.edu/LDP/HOWTO/mini?Ultra-DMA-5.html
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jacobyCommented:
hi bytewiz,

check if the kernel used for the install recognized your SCSI Card.
If it can't see the card, it'll not see your HDD.

After floppy message, you should have something similar to:

scsi :  0 host
scsi :  detected total

If you've this, then you're card isn't see.

scsi : 1 host means you're card is detected.

plz, check this first.
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j2Commented:
ATA and SCSI are two different things, you can NOT hook a ATA drive to a scsi host, or vice versa.
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j2Commented:
and also, if this is a "66Mbyte/s" ATA-drive/controller, they are not supported "out of the box" with Redhat/Mandrake 6.1 (or just about any distro for that matter)
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bytewizAuthor Commented:
Hi jacoby,
   Thank you for u'r  response. as a matter of fact, I do not see the scsi card as all. Is there a work around for this ?? Like say adding a new drive/controller card ??
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j2Commented:
once again, a ATA drive is handled by an ATA controller, NOT a scsi controller.

once again, if this is a 66Mbyte/sec ATA drive, the stock kernels doesnt handle the 66Mbyte/sec controllers.
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rgoughCommented:
The Linux kernel follows two version paths:

Major revision #.even number.latest rev (e.g. 2.0.29) and
Major revision #.odd number.latest rev (e.g. 2.1.10)

The ones with an even number in the middle are the stable revisions for general public use.
The ones with an odd number are experimental development kernels for developers and experienced users.  They are usable if you want to be on the bleeding edge or if they have a feature that you really, really need (like it's the only version that supports your hard drive controller).  The latest development branch is 2.3.xx and they support ATA-66 but the process to get it installed may be a bit daunting to a beginner.

What you'll have to do is somehow get a bootable floppy with the latest 2.3.xx kernel on it.  This may mean finding a pre-compiled kernel on a web or ftp site somewhere and downloading it along with the dos tools for creating Linux bootable floppies (unlikely since it probably won't be configured exactly for your system), or install your distribution to another machine with a supported disk controller, download the latest 2.3.xx source, configure for your machine, build the kernel and make a bootable floppy from it.

Take the bootable floppy to your new system and boot with it.  You're now running a kernel that supports your disk controller.  Somehow install the OS on the computer (I'm not familiar with Mandrake, it could be easy, hard or impossible to do it this way) and before you reboot copy your 2.3.xx onto the hard disk and tell Linux to boot with it instead of the installed one.

I've left out a few dozen steps, but you get the idea.
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j2Commented:
Mandrake = redhat = you either use _their_ bootfloppies, or non at all afaik? :)
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bytewizAuthor Commented:
Thanks, fox. can u tell me what those hex numbers mean ?? how do I find out the corresponding values for my system ?? Thanks.
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foxrCommented:
Those hex numbers are addresses utilized by your adapter should it sit at ide2  You will need to contact Gateway or Promise and have them tell you what these values would be on your system or use some hardware diagnostics and try to determine them on your own. THE SAD TRUTH is that your card is not currently directly supported by any Linux distribution.  People in this forum are only trying to help.  I got the from the promise site and it is simple a sugestion to try typein them a the Linux boot prompt to see if this gets you system to run.  I am including for you a link to the Promise site that has a boot image so you can make a bootable floppy to get your system running.  Hope I helped.
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bytewizAuthor Commented:
I could not see any hyperlink in u'r reply. Can you send it again ?
Thanks
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foxrCommented:
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