Installation Failure

I have tried to install Linux Mandrake 6.5 as a dual boot system and the installation of linux gives me an error 7 code and stops installing. Further the boot magic program that came with this software does not load when the computer starts.
tdchar_Asked:
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bughead1Commented:
I never used Mandrake 6.5, but I did try Mandrake 6.0 and ran into this problem on one box.

Try disabling all cache memory in the bios, and if that doesn't work, try tweaking your memory.  Some of these distros are touchy about memory chips and give "sig 7" or "sig 11" messages and then bug out.

So, let's assume the following: You have something in excess of 32 MB ram installed. If 6.5 is similar to 6.0 in that it gives you an initial installation prompt of "boot:"  -- then at that prompt, type "Linux mem=32M"  (leave the quotation marks off!)

Play with it a bit.  I have one machine with 80 MB of EDO installed. 2 8MB chips in slots 0 and 1, 2 32 MB chips in slots 3 and 4.  The 32 MB chips are a bit flakey. To get it to work right, I used mem=16MB to install, and ultimately was able to edit LILO to run it at 64 MB.  Never used boot magic, but with an error 7 code I suspect cpu or memory.

Perhaps this will help you get started.  If not, try another distro -- for tough problems where more "automated" install programs don't work -- you might look into something like Slackware 4.0 -- it seems to be more forgiving of hardware problems.
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biardCommented:
Also try switching the ram around in the slots to rearrange them.  You may have some bad memory.
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EatEmAndSmileCommented:
Just an update: Slackware 7.0 is out, and it's great.
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bughead1Commented:
Agreed...both Slackware 4.0 and Slackware 7.0 are easier to install, use, and administer IMHOP...but it takes time for people to experiment around and learn this for themselves (the best way).
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tdcharCommented:
I guess part of the problem is that I expected too much from my linux-mandrake. as much as I dislike win 3x & 9x it installs easier than LINUX. That's not a complaint it is a statement of what I expected from the boxed set of disks from a store.
I just want to say a HUGE thankyou to all who have passed my suggestions my way. I truly appreciate your efforts.
Cheers,
Thomas
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EatEmAndSmileCommented:
Ok, but please don't blame Linux for Mandrake's faults... I'm sure you'd have had a much better Linux experience if you have tried Slackware. It's the most easy to use, reliable and with excellent performance Linux distribution available.
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bughead1Commented:
I guess in one sense it is the same old story of substance versus style. Linux emerged as an operating system intended to offer an alternative to pc operating systems that achieved market dominance through marketing strategy rather than through  good design.

Companies have come along and applied the same approach to packaging Linux.  They sought to gain market share by attempting to change the austere image of Linux. Look at the boxes they package the product in...huge, brightly colored boxes with a few cd's, a pamphlet or two and a boot disk.

They tout their changes to Linux as offering superior ease of use and an improvement to the product.

But, the fact is, much of the superior reliability of Linux (and Unix) derives from the fact that it doesn't do everything  automatically.

Face it, computers are still in their infancy.  They are not very reliable.  They can't do the things you need done all by themselves without crashing regularly.

Two major distributions of Linux have pretty much avoided the trap of attempting to automate everything for you -- and haven't succumbed to the allure of fabulous wealth.  That's Slackware and Debian -- quite different in appearance -- but remarkably similar in the end result.  

Now that your feet are wet and you have seen that there are pitfalls with the "glitsy" stuff, shop around for a few good books and learn to administer and use Slackware or Debian.  Brightly colored boxes with pictures of penguins don't make better distributions.

It's worth the effort.  I started last spring with zero computer experience.  I built a small all Linux network at my home to learn the stuff -- and then I built a much larger all Linux network for our company.

If I can do it, anybody can...and I used Slackware.
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EatEmAndSmileCommented:
Great post!
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bughead1Commented:
Naahh -- great Linux distribution!
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Anju111599Commented:
I've had excellent results with the automated install utility which comes with RedHat Linux, and RedHat has free support to help you through those installations which prove too stubborn for the automated installer.  I've been a Linux user since 1994, and I tried a number of different distributions (Debian, Slackware, Yggdrasil, WGS Linux Pro) before settling on RedHat as my favorite.

Automated installers can make life much easier when they work correctly.  However, I agree with bughead1 that there's no substitute for knowledge.  No automated installer is foolproof, including the MS-Windows installer (have I got war stories to tell!)  One must eventually learn to administer one's own system, so it's better to begin sooner than later ;)
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Brandon121799Commented:
What is the website for a slackware distro?
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bughead1Commented:
www.slackware.com  provides a support forum, faq's, links to downloads, etc.  www.cdrom.com is Walnut Creek (to buy the official release).  Cheapbytes also has a single cd of Slack 7.0 for a buck or two.
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javier121999Commented:
I have almost the same problem. After installing Linux Mandrake 6.5, using Partition Magic and Boot Magic, only Windows 98 loads up and I have never been able to load up Linux even with the Linux boot disk. I had just one partion before using Partition Magic. Can anybody comment on this.
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tdcharCommented:
Bughead1 thanks for all the positive info. It is truly appreciated. I like the Linux concept very much and as time permits I plan to do A LOT MORE research and Learning. I now realize I have lots to learn and lots to understand. I do believe it is true that many are jumping on the 'bandwagon' and it will be us novices who will pay the price. Once again to all who have added their comments I thank you very much.
Cheers,
Thomas
tdchar@hotmail.com
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tdcharCommented:
So now I am reading alot of stuff including a fine book by the autor of slackware about instalation and setup of linux. I have still been unable to get Linux-Mandrake to install.
Macmillan USA has been of no help to me.
I give everyone a caveat: Macmillan Publishing's Linux-Mandrake IS NOT SUPPORTED BY LINUX-MANDRAKE. So beware just because it says it is something on the box it does not mean it is supported software.
At any rate I love a challenge and feeling somewhat as Don Quixote I will find a way to slay this windmill.
Cheers,
Thomas
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bughead1Commented:
When I was first experimenting with Linux, I found Macmillan to unresponsive as well...but they weren't any worse than the other commercially supported releases I've tried.

IMHOP (and people can flame me if they want -- I simply don't care) commercial support for operating systems is a joke.   It doesn't matter if it is Linux or not -- you get little for your money.

That is a big reason I think you are going to come to prefer Slackware.  You already started with the books -- and there are other books you will want to get as well -- and the Slackware forum will become  the online technical resource you turn to first.

Good luck -- by the way, another book: Linux System Administration comes with a copy of Slackware 3.5 in the back cover.  
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tdcharCommented:
To bughead1 once again thanks for your comments. The book I mentioned earlier is 'Linux Configuartion & Installation' 4th Edition and it also comes with the full version of Slackware 3.5 on CD's.
I have not gotten to far yet, some 120pgs read, but I would recomend it to all Newbies as a very well written resource. Also in my version of Macmillan Linux-Mandrake it includes a CD with five other titles: three of them are "in 24 hours" books, KDE 1.1, Gimp,Linux and Using Linux and Red Hat Linux 6 Unleashed. So as far as reading material I have lots at hand.
I also took a look at Red Hats Gotcha and Workarounds at their site. Very useful stuff.......
I thankyou for taking the time to keep an eye on things and feel free to contact me at tdchar@hotmail.com
Cheers,
Thomas
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tdcharCommented:
Well.....
I would like to let everyone know where my instalation stands...
I tried just about everything including the Linux/DOS instalation all to no avail.
Finally I decided to try to install it from my hard drive, why not after all all other methods had failed. So....
Guess what?
Come on try.

Ok, the copy process crapped out!

Yes indeed it really seemed to me that the skies should open and a big boot would, well you get the picture.

Neither Dos or Win98 would or could read at least nine files. After finding nine I quit trying to copy files, there may be more. I have sent an e-mail to Macmillan asking for a replacement CD.

We'll see how that goes.

If I may I'd just like to say thank you all once again for your help.

I would like to award the points to bughead1 for all the positive insights.

Cheers,
Thomas
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bughead1Commented:
Tell you what, I'm not into this for any points anyhow, so let's wait until you get Linux up and running. Besides, I've been sort of prodding you toward Slackware, and it appears you don't have a working system yet. I don't believe any points should be awarded until you are up and running.

I'm curious though:  You have the Slackware 3.5 release...Have you tried it?

Just for grins, take a look at the Slackware cdrom.  See the bootdsks.144 directory? There is another called rootdsks.

As long as you can get to them, I think we can have you up and running Slack, long before MacMillan replaces your disk.  
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Brandon121799Commented:
To javier,

   I had RH 6.0 running alongside with win98 then got partitionmagic and bootmagic.  Now installed, I love em because as much as lilo was good, this is a commericial product I know I can trust, ya know?  anyway, i've had no problems, why don't you let Powerquest know?  By the way, thanks for that address but I'm really happy with Red hat so I'll stick with them for a while.  :-)
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tdcharCommented:
To bughead1:
What happened was I thought I'd give Mandrake one more shot, like most I hate to admit defeat.

I plan to work on the Slackware CD in the next day or so. I would like to run it on its own partion and keep my Win98 until I can find a good replacement for my winModem. I'll drop a line in the next day or two.

Cheers,
Thomas
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tdcharCommented:
Bughead1: If I could remember my latin it would help..
None the less, I came, I saw, I got started...

No problems with the install of Slackware 3.5 at all. Period.

I must admit that it made me nervous as compared to my problems with Macmillan..
It installed not questions, no problems and no frustration.

Well it is back to my books for more stuff...

Cheers,
Thomas

Stay in touch.....
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javier121999Commented:
To Brandon,
I could never get BootMagic and PartionMagic to work.  What I did was to Install Linux again without using these programs, just Lilo and finally It is working fine. I really don't what I was doing wrong, but thanks for the comment.
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bughead1Commented:
If I understand correctly, you have successfully installed, and are now using, Slackware 3.5 on your machine.  In as much as both EatEmAndSmile and I both recommended Slackware, we ought to split the points, but since I got here first, I now submit to you the correct answer for Linux on the Intel platform... The envelope please...

The correct answer for Linux on the Intel platform is...(soft ripping sound as the envelope is torn open)...SLACKWARE!!!  Ladies and gentlemen, the most consistently reliable and robust distribution of Linux in every millenia is Slackware!!!!

(Nervous coughs,  scattered applause,  red-faced investors running for the exits)

Just kidding.  I'm glad it worked.  In a couple of weeks you may want to try out some of the newer releases of Slackware if you find some applications you want that require newer libraries.
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tdcharCommented:
bughead1....
Cute, very cute.
I am still in the learning mode (suspect I've been there all my life) with this program.

So far so good. I have yet to hear back from Macmillan regarding a replacement CD.

I have to say that I really enjoyed stopping by here, I have really learned so much at the Xpert Xchng.

Now if this page would let me grade THE answer I'd be happy.

Cheers,

Thomas

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