reconfiguring existing partitions for windows dual-setup

Hi all,

I currently have SuSE 6.3 installed... however due to problems getting sound running on my laptop, I want to install windoze on another partition so that I can have a chance at sequencing.

Now, I have moved around my partitions and files so that I have a spare 1gb partition which has been fat formatted and set up as a Dos partition... the question is what do I do now to stick windows on it and set up a dual-boot system ?
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gravityAsked:
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typical75Commented:
Are you using a full version of Windows or is it a restore disk supplied by your computer manufacturer?
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pc_bCommented:
Install windows as normal, however when you come to reboot you will find that windows has over written the master boot record and only windows boots up. Reboot you computer after windows is installed with the boot up disk you created under linux. If you didn't create one then boot up off your SUSE cdrom disk. Go through the opening set ups, ie color monitor, language, keyboard. Then go to start installation, you should then be offered the option to boot up installed system, use that one. It will then ask for the hard disk partion id that has your root system installed. In my case I would be typing /dev/hda6, put in what yours is. If you put the wrong partion number in, repeat the above. In both cases, ie boot up disk or cdrom bootup, you should end up with your linux system running. Now type in YaST, then select system administration, then select boot / kernel config. Press F4 to add new config, Type in Linux, you can also alter the time delay here and append lines for the kernel config (shouldn't need to put anything in the kernel config/extra parameters) press tab to move about, you will then highlight a box with a choice of operating systems, chose linux. tab down and chose F4 again to add. This time type dos and chose dos from the operating systems. You will also be presented with the hard disk partion that these operating systems reside on, chose the correct ones or type it in. Chose Master boot record for the installation of LILO. Then go to continue, click yes to install LILO. Press esc to gert back to main menu, select ext yast. Reboot, look for the word lilo on the screen, press left shift or left ctrl or alt. type in dos or linux depending which system you want. If you don't press left shift/alt/ or ctrl after the number of seconds you specified in the yast/boot config linux will start automatically. If you press enter as soon as you see the word lilo, linux will start immediately.
     If you find that for some reason or other, that windows has destroyed your linux partion, then delete the partions on the hard drive, recreate using dos a partion big enough for windows and format it. DON'T create any more partions until you have installed windows and got it running, then create your linux partions and install it of your suse cdrom. Install lilo as above.
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pc_bCommented:
Further to the answer I gave above:- If your windows installation insists on taking over the whole of your hard, you will find a utillity called fips on SuSE cdrom disk 1 in the dos directory. Format a floppy in a dos window with the command format a:/s. then copy fips.exe errors.txt & resrorbb.exe from fips2.0 in the  dos directory on the cdrom to the floppy. Reboot the computer using that floppy and follow the instructions to alter the partion size used by windows. Then install linux as normal on the avaiable space using linux to create the linux partions. It is to be noted fdisk / partition creation or deletion should really only be used by the operating system thats being used on that partition. So if you create a partion using dos, put dos on it, not linux and if you want to delete it, use dos again, not linux. use same rule with linux partitions.
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gravityAuthor Commented:
I'll take a look at trying the fips program... right now I'm a bit wary just to install windows and trust that it won't touch other partitions... in my experience it has always overwritten the entire partition table for itself...
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gravityAuthor Commented:
Sorry, after re-reading thru your answer I think you may have gotten hold of the wrong end of the stick.

I currently linux installed and don't want to loose that installation as I can't be arsed to spend the weeks setting it up so well again.

Thus, the Windows installation must be installed on the one specified partition without touching any of the other partitions.
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pc_bCommented:
I have a laptop with SuSe installed. I have created a dos partion as you have and have tried installing Win 95 and Win 98 on that partion with no problems apart from it loseing the linux boot. I did exactly as in the fitst part of my original answer to install LILO to give me a dual boot facility with no problems. You can email if you like at peter@collier-buxton.freeserve.co.uk
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gravityAuthor Commented:
So just a minute -

You stuck you Windows 98 cd in as the machine booted up and proceeded to install it WITHOUT any special tools, nor specifiying any partitions, and it left your existing partitions alone ?
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pc_bCommented:
Yes, it chose c: which was the dos partion
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gravityAuthor Commented:
I'm sorry, but I'm still none the wiser... you just go ahed and let windows try and find your dos partition ??? How's that work ?
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gravityAuthor Commented:
OK, just a minute here...

How do you actually get to Windows setup on the partition in question ? (in this case /dev/hda5)
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pc_bCommented:
If you have a partition named /dev/hda5 I assume that it is an extended partition. You can check this with the fdisk facility in linux or windows install disk. ( ie run fdisk & ask it to print the partition table). If it says extended, look to see if there are logical drives in that extended partition. If the partitions were created by fdisk under linux and none of the extended orlogical drives are used by linux then delete them using the linux fdisk. If you have done a standard partion for linux, you will probably have 2 primary partitons (called linux native (The root partion or /)and linux swap,ID numbers 82 & 83. Reboot using the windows install disk, choose command mode and run fdisk from windows. Tell it to create a primary dos partition. Then format it. You may have done all this alreaddy).When you now come to install windows and it asks where to install it, you will find that the windows install program will automatically say C:\windows, C: is the drive partion you created for dos. Dos you will find will not accept any linux partition numbering (/dev/hda1 etc) and calls the first available free partion C: . Just continue with the installation and when everything is finished go to the first bit I wrote to install the dual boot.
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gravityAuthor Commented:
Right you are, Sorted !
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