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Install RedHat 6.0

I would like to install RedHat 6.0 into my New PC.

- Now, I have win98 installed.
- My PC is Intell Pen II 600,   RAM is 384MB and
  27.5 Gbytes harddrive space.
- So, after I installed RedHat 6.0, I will have dual OS in
  my PC - Win98 and RedHat 6.0.


My purpose is turning my PC into FTP and Web Servers.

My questions are :

- what should I know about my PC before I install RedHat 6.0 ?
  Like what kind of video adpater....(I don't have SCSI     controler, but I have IDE controller).

- Now, I don't have any network card installed, I use dailing up    networking connect to the internet. I will install a network card
  later. So now, what option should I choose to install RedHat   6.0, workstation or server ??? what kind of network card I   should buy ?

- Should I use Partition Magic to seperate my harddrive, one
  for current OS and other for redHat 6.0 ?

- Should I have partition ? I am think to have about 100 user
  accounts. If yes, how and how much ?

- How should I connect to the internet in Linux ? Is there a
  dailing up tool like the one in Win98 ?


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tanc02
Asked:
tanc02
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1 Solution
 
patowicCommented:
You'll need to know your video card.

Since you're using redhat 6.x, which is based on the 2.2.x series of kernels, I'd recommend a Netgear FA310TX--these tulip-based 10/100 PCI ethernet cards are high performance, reliable, and inexpensive.  http://www.ic-direct.com/ carries them for less than $20 each.

Partition Magic will work just fine for resizing your hard drive.  If you don't have any critical data, however, you can always just fdisk the drive, and format it.  Just be sure to install windows before linux.

100 user accounts?  wow.  Okay, you'll want to have a separate /home partition, so when those users fill up their accounts with mp3s and pr0n, it won't fill up the / filesystem as well.  You'll also want to compile your kernel with disk quotas enabled--so you can keep your users in line.  You'll probably also want to subscribe to bugtraq, and read up on security.

There are a couple of tools you can use to get a ppp connection in linux.  diald and pppd are the ones you'll use.  Both have comprehensive manpages, and diald is the subject of a mini-howto at http://www.linuxdoc.org

Good Luck!

(if you like this, and would like me to submit it as an answer, let me know :) )

Jeremy

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Brandon121799Commented:
Like Jeremy said up there for the network stuff which I don't know much about.  If you want to save some money just use fips - I used it with my pent.III 450 system and it worked great.  (Quantum Fireball CX1 13.2gb hd)  If you need help installing Red Hat let me know.  And you'll want Workstation setup - Server will erase EVERYthing on your harddrive, including win98.  going from linux to dual win/lin is hard.  Good luck.
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patowicCommented:
Actually, I'd recommend using a custom install.  Pick out your packages by hand.  Don't trust redhat with anything^h^h^h^h^h^h^h figuring out what packages you need.

I wasn't aware fips worked on great big hard drives--I've only used it on < 2.5gb drives.  Since Brandon says it works, give it a shot :)  I've had excellent luck with it.
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tanc02Author Commented:
For patowic :

So the users account will be in the /home ?
Let say I have 2 gigabytes for user accounts, what will happen
if I want to increase the space for /home ? Do I have to reinstall or what ?


What other partitions should I have ?
For example, /swap should be 348MB RAM * 2 right ?

 
if I use custom install, what package I have select ?
Any suggestion ?
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tanc02Author Commented:
patowic, please post your comments as answer.
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patowicCommented:
Thank you :)

In most distributions of linux, user accounts default to /home.

If 2gb becomes too small, you can always add an additional hard drive, and put all new users on that drive, in something like /home2 .  Adding additional hard drives to linux can be done quite simply--and once you've physically installed the hardware, you can format the new hard drive, and bring it online while the rest of the system is fully operational.

swap can generally be equal to your RAM size.  linux isn't as greedy about swapping as windows is.  I have 128MB ram in my machine, and it almost NEVER hits swap.  If you've got 384 MB of physical RAM, 384mb of swap will be just fine--you'll probably never be over 1% usage ;)

For most linux systems, you can get away with the following filesystems:
/
/home
swap

If you want to get fancy, you can break out /var, and /bin, and other things, but that's often overkill.  I seem to remember that 'Running Linux' has a nice little scheme in it for deciding on partition sizes, and Essential System Administration may as well--browsing through those books at the local Borders can't hurt anything ;)

For custom installs, it really depends on your drive space.  Since you've got scads and scads of disk space, I'd install most everything, and then you can remove stuff as you realize you don't need it.

also, fips should be available through http://www.freshmeat.net/

Bugtraq can be viewed/subscribed to through http://www.securityfocus.com/

Another good security site is http://www.securify.com/  Follow the packetstorm link on the left :)

Good Luck!
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tanc02Author Commented:
About the dailing up networking, I need to call a phone number. And I went to www.linux.org, I cannot found anything about this.
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Brandon121799Commented:
Yes what was I thinking - use a custom install.  I got all excited about making sure you didn't do server I guess.  Thanks Patowic about fips. :-)  Tanc02 - Look at page 30 in your installation guide (or maybe you just downloaded it off the net?)  it says that the largest usable swap partition is roughly 127 mb (that's just about quoted) so I don't know about making your partition bigger than that.  (Wasted space)   Patowic what do you think - Maybe Tanc02 should do a workstation install, then, "upgrade" to handpick the packages he wants.  The workstation will guarantee he will will get linux on his comp (for the most part) and then he can always go back and add or delete packages.  I'm assuming tanc02 is a newbie, at least to Linux.  When I first installed Linux that's what I did.  The whole process of picking packages and satisfying dependancies can be confusing, especially when you just want Something to work!  I'll keep watching this space for your guys's responses.

-Brandon
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patowicCommented:
for dialup networking, check out the diald-mini-howto, at http://www.linuxdoc.org/

I believe that kernel 2.2.x supports swap > 127mb, but it is possible that it does not.  You'll probably be AOK with only 127mb of swap.

I'd tend to go with a complete, custom install.  Select custom, check all the boxes, and go to town ;)  then, later, you can use rpm --erase to remove what ever you don't like...
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Brandon121799Commented:
For the record, I'll just shut up now because Pantowic is by far the expert in this field...  like the red hat book says, partitioning schemes are as varied as the people in the Linux community.  Pantowic has much more experience than me so I would follow his advice!  Since you have all that harddrive space why even risk running out of swap space?
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Brandon121799Commented:
For the record, I'll just shut up now because Pantowic is by far the expert in this field...  like the red hat book says, partitioning schemes are as varied as the people in the Linux community.  Pantowic has much more experience than me so I would follow his advice!  Since you have all that harddrive space why even risk running out of swap space?
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tanc02Author Commented:
For patowic :

You wrote

if 2gb becomes too small, you can always add an additional hard drive, and put all new users on that drive, in something like /home2 ...

I don't want to install another harddrive, what I mean was if
I have /var is too big, and can I minimal /var and reallocate what I minimal into /home ?
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tanc02Author Commented:
where can I get major application free just for Linux. Can I install Win98 program in Linux ?

Where can I get Netscape or IE  Linux verion.
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tanc02Author Commented:
I know I will not running out of space, but I just wnat to know and learn by the notion of "what if".

Patowic, can you tell me what is the different between Workstation and Server installation.
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patowicCommented:
Well, if you want to use windows software, you'll have to try to use wine, available at http://www.winehq.com/ -- but it's not all that complete yet.  It's a free windows emulator, but it's no where near finished.  

Netscape is included with your linux distribution.  IE is not available for linux.  Opera (another browser) will soon be available for linux, but will cost money.

StarOffice is available for free for personal use on linux, and I believe it is included in your redhat 6 distribution.  Wordperfect is also available for free download.  Check out http://www.freshmeat.net for a wide variety of linux software.

There are also linux alternatives to programs such as quicken, and MS Money.

I wish I could tell you the difference between a workstation and server install--I've never tried either.  I've always done custom.  I'll take Brandon's word on it that it'll erase your hard drive if you do a server install.  I certainly wouldn't put it past redhat ;)
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tanc02Author Commented:
What do you mean by this :

 I'll take Brandon's word on it that it'll erase your hard drive if you do a server install.  I certainly wouldn't put it past redhat ;)

will I have a lot of trouble if I choose Server installation ?
What will erase my harddrive ?
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patowicCommented:
Basically, I would _not_ choose server installation.  I believe Brandon when he says it can erase your hard drive.  I say that I wouldn't put it past Redhat, because they have (in the past) made some incredibly bad decisions.  I much prefer turbolinux over redhat, and will be getting a copy of caldera openlinux to play with shortly.

So, the short answer is:  don't choose server install :)
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tanc02Author Commented:
Thanks a lot for you both, especially your rapid response.
I learn a lot from you guys.
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Brandon121799Commented:
Here is directly from the Red Hat manual for 6.0  -

"Workstation-class: Data on any existing Linux partition on any hard drive on your system will be erased.

Server-class:  Data on ALL partitions of all drives will be completely erased, regardless if it is on an existing Linux partition or not."

the, "it" is the installation program.
   I have Corel Wordperfect 8 for Linux, and it works great.  Downloading the newest Staroffice as I write this.  Looking forward to Opera's release for Linux.  It is a great browser for Windows that the few times it does freeze doesn't take down the whole system!  (my 30 day trial ran out yesterday)
   As for wine, I will try it and let you know.  I do know that someone specifically made one for RH 6.0 at  http://www.cse.psu.edu/~juran/wine/

   I'll download it, try it and tell you if it works.  (quickly)
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tanc02Author Commented:
I think I will install it in my old PC first, see what will Linux done to my WIN98, then I will install into my new PC.
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tanc02Author Commented:
Thank brandon. You are so kind
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tanc02Author Commented:
Linux is open source, so will it be secure enough to choose this as main server, since all the hacker can look at the source.
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tanc02Author Commented:
There are 3 kinds of turbolinux. The most exspensive one  like $995 is the most secure server.

How should I know my RedHat 6.0 is secure for web/FTP servers ?
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Brandon121799Commented:
I'm hoping Patowic sees this.  I have an incident in Setup that I would appreciate your help on.  You can read all about it there, but the quick of it when I installed Gnome last night it screwed everything up then when I tried to fix it by reinstalling I messed Linux itself up.  See I have a winmodem and I did all this this morning in windows before going into Linux.  After we were done here I downloaded wine, put it on a cd, then rebooted to go into Linux.  Unforutnatley, I have to get Linux working before I can try wine!!  But once it works again I will put it(wine) on there and try it!  Thanks!
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patowicCommented:
I wouldn't buy the $1k version of turbolinux.  That's too expensive ;)  Check out http://www.cheapbyes.com/ -- they should have a $4 or $5 version of turbolinux.  If not, email them and ask for one (and comment here--I'll ask then, too).  Maybe if a bunch of us ask at once, they'll start carrying it again.

Redhat _can_ be secure, but it usually isn't out of the box.  That's why you need to keep up on bugtraq and other things.  If you really want a secure OS, check out OpenBSD.  Be forewarned, however, OpenBSD is not for the newbie.  It's more arcane than linux, that's for sure.

As to your winmodem, Brandon...well, you're SOL.  No support for those yet :(

How did Gnome screw things up?  What's the behavior you saw?  And when you say reinstalling linux messed things up, what state is your machine in now?  Can you boot to linux?  does lilo load successfully?  Do you have a rescue floppy lying about?  Feel free to either continue commenting here, or if you want to take this to email, head over to my allexperts page at http://www.allexperts.com/displayexpert.asp?expert=8377, where you can drop me an email directly (without exposing my email address to spammers ;)  )

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