Need Set-up help for Macmillan's Deluxe Linux OS 6.0

Hi -- I'm probably in the same boat a lot of other Newbies are here, bought Macmillan Software's Deluxe Linux Operating System 6.0, found it had multiple Set-up and boot disks with both an Installation Guide and a Getting Started guide (with the extra 3rd CD!), which tended to conflict with each other.  I had gotten another hard drive in my Dell Pentium II 333, just so I could load Linux there and switch boot between that and NT 4.0 (what I'm already running).  The instructions tend to leave a lot of steps out or don't match what I see happen.  Plus, I mistakenly formatted the new, extra drive for two 10 Gig partitions in NTFS (really, the only thing you can do, FAT-32 doesn't go up to 10 or 20 Gigs), only to find that Deluxe Linux OS 6.0 wants you to be in FAT to be able install & format with EITHER (Installation Guide) fips20 or (Getting Started Guide) a Linux Boot version of Partition Magic and Boot Magic.  But wait!  That's not confusing enough yet.  I printed out all my drivers and info, I know the new, extra drive I want to install on has an SCSI card of a Tyan 32Bit Ultra DMA Bus Mastering Driver (tynbmnt4) going to a an IBM-DJNA -352030 (Firmware J580) drive.  But as I go through the Linux Set Up (Linux-Mandrake) and it asks me if I have an SCSI Adaptor and then say "Yes," it asks me which one, and the Tyan is found NOWHERE on the list.  In fact, the list is rather short for SCSI drivers.  If I try any on the list, it says it can't find my hardware on the Autoprobe.  AND... there is no escape from the install sequence, I have to hard-reboot (cntrl.-alt.-del.) every time to get out of there.

I am really lost here.  Any Suggestions?  Is this the right place to be getting help for Macmillan Software's Deluxe Linux Operating System 6.0?  Please let me know, either way, thanx.

-- 'Faddah' Steve Wolf
   Emeryville, CA
   faddahwolf@earthlink.net
faddahAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
j2Connect With a Mentor Commented:
"I want to install on has an SCSI card of a Tyan 32Bit Ultra DMA Bus Mastering Driver (tynbmnt4) going to a an IBM-DJNA -352030"

Thats a IDE drive, not a scsi one. (its a deskstar 25Gp, an old 5400rpm drive)

"(really, the only thing you can do, FAT-32 doesn't go up to 10 or 20 Gigs)"

yes it does, otherwise you are doing somethign wrong. FAT32 supports up to two terrabyte.

Remove all the partition from the new drive before installing, ALL distributions of linux i have tried so far allows you to partition from within the Installer. Linux uses the ext2fs filesystem, not fat, and not fat32, not NTFS (you can make it ACCESS those partitions, but that is another thing)

But your reall error is thinkign you have a SCSI system, which you do not.

And, if this is one of the Dells which have UDMA/66 controllers, i just have to say "good luck" since linux does not support those as of yet.

0
 
mzehnerCommented:
You said "Plus, I mistakenly formatted the new, extra drive for two 10 Gig partitions in NTFS (really, the only thing you can do, FAT-32 doesn't go up to 10 or 20 Gigs)"
I have a 20G Hard drive formatted FAT32.  Is this really possible?
You said "Deluxe Linux OS 6.0 wants you to be in FAT to be able install & format".  This may be true, but strange.  If your Linux needs to install on a DOS formatted partition, it's not Linux and you should send it back.  I don't know what type of Linux Macmillan put out but all versions that I know need a Linux Native partition (ext2) and a Linux Swap partition.
I suggest setting up your first partition on the second drive as Linux Native (3-6G), then a 130Mb Linux swap, then the rest NTFS.  You need the last part to be NTFS for the following reasons.
1.  NT and Linux can see them.  You can share data between NT and Linux this way.
2.  You can't use FAT32 here.  Linux can use it but NT can't.
Sorry, I can't help you with the SCSI adapter.
0
 
j2Commented:
You could look at
http://www.csie.ntu.edu.tw/~b6506063/hpt366/

to see how you 'sorta' can make UDMA/66 controllers work if that is what you have. (but that requires that you really have a good working experience with linux)
0
All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.