New System Folder?

I've just installed a new Hard Drive - painstakingly... after discovering that I can't have two IDE drives in at teh same time
I had to copy everything over to my iMac by ethernet... then try and get it back to the new drive.. but anyway... it's back on the new hard drive now

I've got it set up with two partitions, 500megs and 5.5gigs

At the moment, it's starting up with virtually an empty system folder on the smaller partition... but I can't get it to recognize that the folder called 'System Folder' on the larger partition is what I want to boot from...

Any suggestions anyone?


Cheers
dankarranAsked:
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weedCommented:
Well you have two possibilities.

1) open your Startup Disk Control Panel and choose the partition you want to boot from

2) Download ftp://ftp.apple.com/devworld/Utilities/System_Picker_1.1a3.sit.hqx which will "bless" your system and force it to boot from the one you want.

Of course theres always the possibility that the "minimum" system youre running from is incomplete or is missing a vital part that it needs to boot and therefore just WONT boot.

Also it is possible to have two IDE drives in a beige g3, blue and white g3, and g4. You have to set them up as "master" and "slave" but it can be done. Look to www.macfixit.com or www.xlr8.com for info on setting this configuration up.
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brian_bCommented:
Well, this should be simple.
If the control panel "Startup Disk" is installed, select the larger drive as the startup disk first off. Second, is the system folder on the larger drive blessed? If you drag the system file out of the current system folder on the smaller drive, then double click the system folder on the larger drive, it will do what's called, "Blessing" that folder. You'll be able to tell because the icon on the folder will have the little mac Smile on it. If it isn't blessed, it will look like a regular folder. Basically you can have many system folders as wanted, not advised though, but only one can be "Blessed" and tis done in the way I mentioned. Just drag out system, you'll see it become unblessed, and double click to open and close the one you want active.
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brian_bCommented:
damnit, you answered the question while I was typing it. heheheh.
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brian_bCommented:
damnit, you answered the question while I was typing it. heheheh.
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dankarranAuthor Commented:
Thanks... I whish I could share the points between you both but it won't let me  :}

I'll bless it later

As for having two IDE drives... it is an older machine (a clone) and the supplier tells me that I can't have the two going together (plus i've tried it in various configurations)
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weedCommented:
Ahhh ok the clones are set up different. You can do it with a beige g3 and up though.
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