Upgrading 95 to Win98

We have the full version (not the Upgrade) of Win98.  I have read how to change the Win.com to Win.sav and DOS directory to DOSOLD.  But I think I would rather do a clean install from scratch.  I have a start disk. but it does not seem to give me access to the CDROM.  So. My Question is 1. How do I remove Win95 from my system to do a clean install and 2. How do I get access to the CD so I can install 98 from there.  (Perhaps something is wrong with my start up disk)
Thank you
Cheryl
primeauxAsked:
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bchewConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You can fdisk your hard drive to get rid of Win95 AFTER you have a good startup disk.  The easiest way is to make a Windows 98 startup disk if you have access to another machine that already has Win98 on it.  (Control Panel, Add/Remove Programs, Windows Setup, Startup Disk).  If you can't do that, then you need to find or download the DOS drivers for your CDROM.  These then need to be added to your config.sys and autoexec.bat files on the diskette.

Let us know which path you want to follow and I think we can help you get there.

Good Luck,

Bert
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primeauxAuthor Commented:
Adjusted points to 100
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MrbreezeCommented:
There are lots of ways to make a boot disk in order to access your CD ROM drive. The simplest is to create a Windows 95 Startup Diskette, edit the startup files, then add just two (or three) files to diskette. Here are the files you'll need to add to the Startup Diskette:

MSCDEX.EXE
The driver for your CD ROM.
(Maybe) HiMem.sys (some versions of Win95 add it, others don't).

Here's how to make a "Windows 95 Startup Disk

1)Click Start
2)Go to Settings
3)Go to the Control Panel
4)Double-Click "Add/Remove Programs"
5)Choose the Startup Disk Tab
6)Insert a blank floppy disk, and click the button to make a startup disk.

You need a copy of MSCDEX.EXE from whatever computer you used to make the startup diskette. You can typically find it in the x:\Windows\Command directory. (change x to reflect the letter of the directory where Windows is installed) Copy this file to the floppy disk as well.

Next, if you don't already have HiMem.Sys on the startup disk you made, you'll need to add it to your startup diskette as well. It's usually found on the x:\Windows directory. (change x to reflect the letter of the directory where Windows is installed)

Next, you'll need to add to the disk a copy of the driver for your CD ROM
The easiest way to get this is to copy your config.sys file from your machine onto the floppy and then edit it
Also copy your autoexec.bat file to the floppy

Insert your Windows 95 Startup Disk and reboot the computer.
When it gets to the a:\> prompt, type edit config.sys then press enter.
Edit the file so that it reads as follows:
DEVICE=HIMEM.SYS
DEVICE=CDROMDRV.SYS /D:IDECD001

The second line may not be exact but it will be similar.

After editing the file, press Alt and then the X key. You'll be asked if you want to save the changes. Choose Yes.

Next, you'll need to edit the autoexec.bat file. Here's how:

When it gets to the a:\> prompt, type edit autoexec.bat then press enter.
Edit the file so that it reads as follows: (add the following line to what is probably a blank window)
MSCDEX.EXE /D:IDECD001 /L:D /M:10

Change the /L:D to reflect the letter that your CD ROM normally uses

You should then be able to boot from this floppy and your Cd player be accessable
Insert your Win cd and type
D:\setup   where D: is your Cd letter.

Hope that can help you.
                          Mrbreeze
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Adam LeinssCommented:
You may have a non-ATAPI (aka non-standard) CD-ROM drive and that's why the generic drivers don't work (they assume that you have a CD-ROM that adheres to ATAPI standards).  If you give us the make and model of the CD-ROM, I'm sure one of us can locate the drivers for you.
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sikfanCommented:
most motherboards can boot from cdrom these days.
The win98 cd I have is bootable, and if you enable booting from cd-rom in your bios, then when your machine boots and sees a bootable cdrom in the drive (trust me, it does.....even without drivers) then the bootloader on the cdrom will interrogate your cdrom drive and install the relevant drivers to continue installation.

Once the first part of the installation process has completed and the machine asks to reboot, remember to change the bios boot setting back to boot from C: otherwise the cdrom boot loader will kick in again.

Hope this helps.

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rayt333Commented:
sikfan
Please refrain from posting as an answer until you "KNOW" that what you post is the answer, you have made a guess and in my opinion a wild but very wrong guess. Most of the "newer" computers have a MB thats supports the booting to a CD-Rom, also these newer computer comes with Win98 pre-installed, the clue you missed was they were upgrading to Win98 from Win95, and "MOST" older computers do not support the booting to a CD-Rom. You should post comments first to find out the current setup then when you "KNOW" what will help then post it. Please remember "Comments" can be accepted as answers now
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primeauxAuthor Commented:
yes, we were up grading to the win98 from a win95 machine that was several years old.  
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primeauxAuthor Commented:
Thank you.  I made a startup disk on our church computer which has win98 as you said.  put it in there (after saving all I needed) and then 'fdisk'ed the c:drive. then put in the cd and ran set up.  worked perfect thanks.

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