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Setting up my VB app on a network.

How can I set up my VB 4 app on a network and have the users access it immediately.  I don't want to perform a setup and install the app on each user's PC. All the necessary runtime files (dlls etc.) should reside on the network only. Thanks to all who respond.
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Qwento
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Qwento
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1 Solution
 
adityauCommented:
I don't think it would be possible. Some Dll's should be present in your System directory.
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jjmartinCommented:
There's no way of getting around the installation process.  Any VB program you run is going to expect to find certain files in the PC's system directory.  If you need to truly deploy a program that requires no additional installation by the user, try using a web based approach.  You can usually count on somebody having a web browser on their PC.
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Éric MoreauSenior .Net ConsultantCommented:
If you don't want to go on each user's PC, you can use tools such as SMS to automatically deploy your application to users.

If you can't afford SMS and your concerns is about updating to new versions, you should consider installing your application to the user's computer normally and then create a batch file that copies new version of your files from the server to the user's computer, then register DLL files and finally launch your app. I do this during beta testing (when versions change almost everyday!).
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moterkCommented:
I just put my app and all the VB runtime files in the same folder on the network.  My App is used on 5 machines and I installed it on none of them.
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Éric MoreauSenior .Net ConsultantCommented:
for moterk: And everything is working like it is suppose too? If so, it is because all the required files were already on your 5 PCs.
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BHimmerickCommented:
You can install the app on the network with no problems.  I've accomplished this several times.   However, the problems occur if the client machine has different components ie:ADO or whatever you used. If this is the case you could use a product like SMS to update the client machines. Or for cheaper quicker results maybe create a .bat file that will update any components.   You could also check out Windows Installer which pretty much walks you thru the process.  This is a good way to run your application but if your network has problems so will your app.
Good Luck!
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QwentoAuthor Commented:
Good answer.  Kind of thought I couldn't do exactly what I wanted to do. Glad you commented on other answers. Haven't decided what I'm going to do yet.

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moterkCommented:
Yes emoreau, everything is working as it is supposed to.  I know what has been istalled on these 5 machines (because I am the one who installed all apps on all 5 machines). One of them have never had a VB5 app installed on it.  Since the files are not registered, on that machine Windows looks for (and finds) them is the App folder and it runs fine.
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QwentoAuthor Commented:
Thanks but.... In my experience, where the applicatation and runtime files only existed on the network, only the PC's that had the necessary files or VB could run the application.  I tried this recently on a PC that didn't and got an error where the app was looking for an OCX file that was on the apps network directory but not on the user's PC.  The app did not run.
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Éric MoreauSenior .Net ConsultantCommented:
My experiences conducted to the same result as qwento.

When an application starts, class ID are retrieved to open components (DLL and/or OCX). This class ID is then search in the local registry. Registry is updated with class id on installation of applications and/or components.

If the class id is found, the hive called InProcServer32 is read to obtain the path to the component. The component is then loaded.

If the class id is not found, your user see the fabulous error "429 - Can't create component object".

So placing components in the same folder as the application, CAN'T work (at least with VB4-32, VB5 and VB6 running on Windows 95/98/NT). Windows 2000 have a new feature that will allow developer to place ALL required components in a folder an run the application from this folder without registering them (If I remember well, it is something like ApplicationName.Locale).
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moterkCommented:
My app does not use any dlls or ocxs beyond the VB5 runtime files.  Perhaps if additional dlls were needed or if any ocxs was needed then it would not run.
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Éric MoreauSenior .Net ConsultantCommented:
>Perhaps if additional dlls were needed or if any ocxs was needed then it would not run.

IT WOULDN'T!
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