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RMI going to die??

My friend told me RMI is going to die.

I can not believe it?
I am very sad to hear the news


Does anyone has any idea?

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Phoebe
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Phoebe
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1 Solution
 
s_franklinCommented:
Your friend may be alluding to corba as a competing technology that could replace RMI. There has been some discussion on Java newsgroups that Sun seems to be more and more open to Corba versus RMI although there has been no slowdown in RMI support and maturation in the Java spec. I would suggest that RMI is not going to disappear any time soon. Corba arguably wins on scalability and there seems to be some evidence that it wins in some areas of performance although I can't personally back that up.

There is an excellent document on the OMG site discussing RMI and Corba: http://www.omg.org/library/wpjava.html. I would suggest that it agrees with the conclusion above - RMI has a place, but its place is not as big as might once have been thought.

Steve


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heyhey_Commented:
RMI has a place if you are implementing distributed Java applications ... if you need to connect them with Cobol app - you'll need Corba.

RMI is 'good' Java technology.
Corba is multi-platform solution.
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s_franklinCommented:
All valid points. In the context of the original question, the answer is "no, RMI is not going to die". However, there have been plenty of hints from Sun developers on newsgroups, small indications of increased CORBA support, and a shift in emphasis on CORBA in proposed java-centric architectures.

The advantage of CORBA over RMI is that CORBA works with distributed java applications as well. 2 year from now, if you want to expand your architecture with some components that RMI is not happy to interact with, you have that option with CORBA. Because technologies and architectures (especially web-based ones) are always in a state of flux, you have more options with CORBA from the very start.

There are also some real-world but informal benchmark discussions on the newsgroups that show performance improvements with CORBA over RMI.

So, RMI will not die any time soon in answer to the question. But, as CORBA gets easier to find/use, and now that J2EE emphasizes that CORBA is part of the spec such that your primary middle-tiers are implementing full-fledged ORBs, CORBA will likely continue to grow as the "popular" solution.

Yes, you are right - RMI is 'good' Java technology. But as I mentioned earlier, it's too hard to predict where your architecture is going. Assuming that your system should be able to grow to cross-platform, cross-language and distrubted architecture from the very start is often a worthwhile thing.

Steve
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heyhey_Commented:
RMI can pass Java object by value (for example you can pass Vector of Strings as parameter), while you can only send primitive types (int, String, byte array) in Corba - that's why RMI is (was :) better for Java-to-Java communication... as far as I remeber Corba was supposed to (partially) support sending objects by value, but since it is quite Java specific version I doubt that that it will be successful.

so some 'Java specific Corba extension' will be the best solution :)
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