linux Suzie NIC and subnet

i have a 3com NIC cards i want to make a little network i want to ask how we can configure this NIC and how we can make the subnetting and everything related

i need detailed description bcs i am new at linux (suzie) operating system
but i know windows nt
raslanAsked:
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handrichCommented:
Hi
you unfortunately have 3Com NICs, these are not well supported, it is better to use intel or Digital (netgear) based NIC's,
Best regards
Michael
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dcavanaughCommented:
3com cards can be made to work.  I have used both ISA and PCI 3com cards, with minimal hassle.

1. Find an unused IRQ on your computer.  With the NIC card NOT INSTALLED, Use the "cat /proc/interrupts" command to get a list of active IRQs.  I like IRQ 10, it's almost always unused.

2. If your 3com card is ISA, you will need an IO address.  Similar to #1, use the "cat /proc/ioports" command to get a list of active IO addresses.  I like 0x300.

3. Install the card, then disable "Plug-and-Pray".  You should either have or can download (http://www.3com.com) a 3com floppy-based configuration utility for your card.  Boot your machine from a DOS floppy and insert the 3com floppy.  In the case of 3com ISA, the program is called 3C5X9CFG or something like that.  Try this: 3C5X9CFG /PNPDISABLE  

4. Using the configuration floppy, force the media type to UTP.  Try not to leave anything auto-detected.  Set the IRQ and IO address to the values you intend to use (IRQ 10 and IO 0x300 are my favorites).  Shut down the machine (power off). Then reboot.

5. If you are using an ISA card, be sure your ROM BIOS is going to allocate your IRQ to the ISA bus.  In your BIOS setup, there is probably as screen called PCI or Bus configuration.  If you change it from "auto" to "manual", you should be able to force the IRQ in question to "Legacy/ISA".

6. Bring up Linux, then check your /etc/conf.modules file.  There should be lines like this for ISA:

alias eth0 3c509
options 3c509 irq=10 io=0x300

or this for PCI:

alias eth0 3c59x

Let the driver auto-sense the IO and IRQ if you are using 3com PCI.  

7.  Make sure your Linux box is doing a "depmod -a" somewhere in the startup sequence.  In most modern releases, this is not a problem.

The key to making these cards work is disabling PNP, and using the configuration utility to dictate all of the settings (media, speed, etc.) that could possibly be auto-detected.  Linux will generally auto-sense the proper IO and IRQ for 3com cards, so long as you never let the card make any decisions on its own!

When you set up your network, I presume you will be doing something like a private network, class C (approx. 254 possible addresses).  

When you set up IP networking, use these settings:

IP address: 192.168.1.1
Network: 192.168.1.0
Mask: 255.255.255.0
Broadcast: 192.168.1.255

All the machines in your private network will have the same network, mask, and broadcast addresses, with a default gateway of 192.168.1.1.  Each client machine will have an individual unique 192.168.1.x address (where x = 2...254)

After you get all of this up and running, what are your intentions?  Samba file/print server? Dial-up ISP access combined with IP Masquerade?  Cable modem? ISDN (Noooooo!)?  

It all starts with basic IP connectivity.  If you get the card installed and can successfully ping the 192.168.1.1 address, that would be a good start.  

If you have trouble with the card, please tell me the exact model of 3com card you have.

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raslanAuthor Commented:
thank u very much : dcavanaugh i think i will try it and then i will give u the points ok

just give me a couple of days ok

do u have an html document on how to use linux suzie or do u know a site??
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dcavanaughCommented:
You must surely know about http://www.suse.com, so take a look at these:

http://www.freshmeat.net
http://www.linux.org
http://www.linuxapps.com

At http://www.linuxdoc.org ; they have an archive of FAQ and HOWTO guides with a search engine.  Very useful stuff.  You should be able to seach on "3com" and get more information than you ever wanted about this kind of installation.  There are plenty of other useful Linux sites, but if you visit the ones I mentioned, you will find enough links to keep you busy for years.
 
Back to the original question: I assume this is a UTP installation, and you are using some kind of hub with Category 5 cable connections to your Linux server and other PC's, right?   I just had to ask.

By all means keep this question open until you have the card installed, recognized at bootup as eth0 and you can ping the IP address from at least one client PC.  
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