Oddness with RAM

I am currently building myself a new computer, and I ran across something while looking for RAM.  A site that I was ordering from had 128 MB RAM simm and on the site it said NOT WIN2000 COMPATIBLE.  Now...as a programmer, I am REALLY not understanding how an OS can conflict with RAM to the point of not being compatible.  Have any of you heard of this, and if so, is this something I need to look out for??

~Aaron
LVL 3
BudVVeezerAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

jhanceCommented:
There are no special RAM requirements (other than quantity) imposed by Win2000.  

I'd suspect a shady vendor who is trying to capitalize on uninformed customers and charge more for Windows2000 RAM than for "standard" RAM.  

As long as the RAM you buy is correct for your hardware w.r.t. speed, parity/ECC, form factor (SIMM, DIMM, RIMM, etc), then there is nothing to be concerned about when using Win2000.

BTW, my experience with W2K shows that 128MB is the MINIMUM that should be used.  64MB is SLOOOOOWWWWW.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
BudVVeezerAuthor Commented:
Yeah, I still haven't decided if I'm going to go with Win2k as being the main OS.  With 20.4 GB HD, I think I might have a few OSs on there so I can work on different environments.  =)  Thanks!

~Aaron
0
jhanceCommented:
Bud,

In my opinion it doesn't matter whether you want W2K or not.  Eventually, MS is going to force all Windows users to it so they can kill the DOS-based Win9x family once and for all.  I predict that MS will push all corporate Win9x users to W2K by the end of 2000 through hook, crook, arm twisting, and big incentives.  After that, the focus will be on consumer systems.  They won't directly work on end-users but will push the system vendors their way.  After 1-2 years of all new systems shipping with Windows 20XX, where do you think the market will be centered?
0
The Ultimate Tool Kit for Technolgy Solution Provi

Broken down into practical pointers and step-by-step instructions, the IT Service Excellence Tool Kit delivers expert advice for technology solution providers. Get your free copy for valuable how-to assets including sample agreements, checklists, flowcharts, and more!

BudVVeezerAuthor Commented:
I am thinkin that MS is going to HAVE to pay more attention to the home user or they will lose the market to MacNCrash.  If they focus on just the business aspect of their market, they are ignoring a large portion of people...  What are your thoughts?

~Aaron
0
jhanceCommented:
I don't think they care about home users much.  Think about who they sell to:

1) Corporate IT.
2) Computer OEMs.
3) Software retailers.

With #1, it's a slam dunk.  All they argue about is the discount level to keep competitive tool off corporate desktops.  They also use their desktop power as leverage to keep non-Microsoft server software like Novell and unix/Linux out of the backroom.  It's like this, "Well give you a 10% discount on your $25M worth of WinNT, Office 2000, etc. if you promise to be a 100% Microsoft infrastucture.

#2, it's also a slam dunk.  Are Dell, Compaq, HP, etc. going to drop Windows?  In favor of Linux perhaps??  I don't see this happening, at least not with Windows being "adequate".

#3.  They flood the market.  Just go to CompUSA and walk down the software aisle.  There are small sections on one side for all the various vendors and their little utilities.  On the entire other side of the aisle there is just box after box of Microsoft software.  Hmmmm, does shelf space matter in retail sales?  You betcha....


As far as Apple is concerned they're luck to be alive.  In fact, you'll remember that it was Microsoft who played a big part in keeping them afloat during their cruch time.  Do you think there might have been a agreement that will keep Apple in their little market niche?  This is not to say it's not a good niche, but it _IS_ a niche.
0
BudVVeezerAuthor Commented:
Very true!  In my opinion, if Mac wants to have a chance at gaining more of a niche, they need to stop focusing on cute, and need to get more into business programs.  They have some, but barely seem viable.  I really am not too sure where MS is going to go.  I am very dissapointed in the fact that every MS upgrade depends on every other MS upgrade.  And ALL of them require more memory!  Icky!

~Aaron
0
jhanceCommented:
My prediction is that owning stock in DRAM companies would be wise in the next 12-18 months.

0
BudVVeezerAuthor Commented:
Why DRAM companies?  Aside from the fact that Winblows will continue to expand it's memory munching programs?  ;-P  I would say follow sound card companies, followed right by vid card companies.  Sound cards haven't changed since Win3.0.  I would think that's gotta change soon.  And with more RAM comes better graphics, and thanks to DVD, it's gonna boom a bit more..

~Aaron
0
jhanceCommented:
Well I believe that Win2000 will be an unqualified success.  Microsoft is going to make a lot of money and their stock price is already "anticipating" this success.  

But the "standard" issue PC has between 32-64MB of RAM these days as it comes from the factory.  This is not enough.  There is going to be huge demand for DRAM as the standard moves up to 128-256MB.  

Anyone can make sound cards, video cards, etc.  This is "low" technology and low budget stuff. Plants in Taiwan startup practically over a weekend and start making PC boards.  

DRAM manufacturing today takes a factory that costs $2B and takes 2-3 years to build and get online.  Nobody jumps into the DRAM manufacturing business and today supplies are already tight.  It's a recipe for major profits.

My favorites, Micron Technology (MU) and RamBus (RMBS).  Both are heavily dependent on the memory market.  Many of the other players are conglomerates who have many other lines of business.  So they aren't leveraged by the memory market as highly.

Just a thought....

BTW, check the historical prices for RAMs during the periods after the very successful rollout of both Windows 95 and Windows NT4.0.  Both created a surge in demand for memories and a resultant shortage of parts.
0
BudVVeezerAuthor Commented:
that very true...I take it you watch the markets heavily?  btw, what is it you do for a living?  I'm a college student, I don't HAVE a living.  ;-P  But in my spare time I work for Home Depot.  Yee haw.  =P  I am looking into video game programming as a career, and am already heading down that path with what I am learning.  =)  The only stocks I watch are the home depot ones and that's because I have a discount on it.  ;-P  If I had more than 50 cents to spare I would love to play with the market, but...heh.

~Aaron
0
jhanceCommented:
I wouldn't say that I watch them heavily but as with everything else, the way you succeed in the market is to be aware early of market forces that drive company stock prices.  Since I work in the computer industry and follow what is going on as a result of my work, it's possible to become aware of trends that may have escaped the professional stock-watchers so far.

BTW, Home Depot is also a good stock in my opinion!
0
BudVVeezerAuthor Commented:
It IS a good one, I can tell you that much.  It goes up, splits and goes up again.  ;-P  I like that.  And they give the employees 10% off on stock options which makes it even nicer.  I have a friend who bought his stock at 45 CENTS back in 87 when the market crashed.  It was at 101$ when it split a month ago, and is sitting around 60 right now.  So as you can imagine, he's done pretty well for himself.  ;-P  Aside from internet/computer stock, what do you see as being decent?  I would think medical stock maybe?

~Aaron
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Components

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.